Henso-zu (変相図)

Henso-zu, as Buddhist painting, describes the scenery of the Pure Land and Hell. It is also simply called Henso. It is occasionally referred to as Mandara, such as Jodo Mandara (for example, Taima mandara and Chiko mandara), but it is actually different from the mandara that is systematically described based on the dogma in Esoteric Buddhism. In Japan, Jodo henso-zu (Jodohen in short, or Jodo mandara) is known, which describes the scenery of the Pure Land such as the West Pure Land (gokuraku jodo, or the Pure Land of Amida Buddha) where the Amida Nyorai is supposed to live.

Jodo hensozu
The Jodo henso-zu, which describes the scenery of the Pure Land, has the following characteristics:

Jodo henso-zu, describing the scenery of Mt. Ryojusen and Shaka Nyorai in the center;
Jodo henso-zu, describing the scenery of Toho joruri sekai (Eastern Pure Land) and Yakushi Nyorai in the center;
Jodo henso-zu, describing the scenery of Saiho Gokuraku Jodo (the West Pure Land) and Amida Nyorai in the center;
Jodo henso-zu, describing the scenery of Tosotsuten (The fourth of six heavens in the world of desire) and Amida Nyorai in the center;
Jodo henso-zu, describing the scenery of Fudaraku and Kannon Bosatsu in the center, and so forth.