Muryoju-kyo Ubataisha Ganshoge (the Verses on the Aspiration to Be Born in the Pure Land) (無量寿経優婆提舎願生偈)

"Muryoju-kyo Ubataisha Ganshoge" is a commentary on "Muryoju-kyo Bussetu Muryoju-kyo (the Sutra on the Buddha of Immeasurable Life)" compiled by Seshin, which was translated into Chinese by Bodhiruci in the Northern Wei dynasty. As of 2008, the Sanskrit original is not in existent and only the Bodhiruci version remains in Chinese translations. In general, it is called "Jodoron (the Treatise on the Pure Land)" for short, and also called "Ojoron (the Treatise on Rebirth in the Pure Land)" and "Muryoju-kyoron (the Treatise on the Sutra of Immeasurable Life)". The original title is formally written "無量壽經優婆提舍願生偈" (compiled by Vasubandhu and translated by Bodhiruci in the later Wei dynasty).

It consists of gaathaa (verse) and chogo (prose), and the latter in particular expounds "gonenmon" (Five Practice-Gates of Mindfulness) as a way of Jodo Ojo (Rebirth in the Pure Land).

The 'gonenmon' refers to 'reihaimon' (the gate of worship), 'santanmon' (the gate of praise), 'saganmon' (the gate of aspiration) 'kanzatsumon' (the gate of contemplation) and 'ekomon' (the gate of directing virtue). In particular, the Muryoju-kyo Ubataisha Ganshoge focuses on the 'kanzatsumon' which is to contemplate the pure land consisting of 17 kinds of kokudo shogon (the adornment of land), eight kinds of hotoke shogon (仏荘厳) (the adornment of the Buddhas) and four kinds of bosatsu shogon (the adornment of Bodhisattvas).

China

As mentioned above, it was translated into Chinese by Bodhiruci.

Donran who was a friend of Bodhiruci gave a commentary to the "Jodoron" and compiled "Muryoju-kyo Ubadaisha Ganshogechu" which is called "Jodoronchu (the Commentary on Treatise on the Pure Land) or "Ojoronchu (the Commentary on the Treatise on Rebirth in the Pure Land)" for short.

Japan

Influenced by the thought, Honen valued it as 'sangyo Ichiron' (the three sutras and one commentary) along with 'Jodo sanbu kyo' (the three Pure Land sutras).