Taho Nyorai (多宝如来)

Taho Nyorai (Buddha of Many Treasures who is depicted in the Lotus Sutra) is one of the Nyorai (Tathagata), an object to worship in Buddhism. It's called Prabhuta-ratna in Sanskrit, and 'Taho' is a free-translation (giving a general meaning). It is the Buddha who appeared in Hoke-kyo Sutra (the Lotus Sutra) and acclaimed the preaching of Sakyamuni. It's enshrined in Tahoto pagodas (a "multi-treasure" pagoda), or placed as a honzon (principal object of worship at a temple) together with Sakyamuni-butsu (Shaka Nyorai) on both sides of Tahoto pagodas ("itto ryoson," two objects of worship in one pagoda).

Kenhotohon, the 11th chapter of Hoke-kyo Sutra

Taho Nyorai is one of the former Buddha (a myriad of Buddhas who reached enlightenment before Sakyamuni), and is believed to live in the land called Treasure Purity in an immeasurable thousand, ten thousand million of asamkhyas of worlds to the east ('immeasurable thousand, ten thousand million of asamkhyas of worlds' means 'far-off'). There are few examples of Taho Nyorai made as a single statue throughout China, Korean Peninsula, and Japan, and it's mostly represented in pairs with Shaka Nyorai (Sakyamuni) based on the religious belief in Hoke-kyo Sutra. The reason for representing Shaka Nyorai and Taho Nyorai in pairs is based on the following anecdote in Kenhotohon, the 11th chapter of Hoke-kyo Sutra.

When Sakyamuni (Shaka) was preaching, a huge hoto (treasure pagoda) decorated with seven treasures (jewels and precious metals) appeared from the ground and floated in the air. From the inside of the hoto, a loud voice praising Sakyamuni's preach was heard. Great. Sakyamuni.
The dharma (teachings of the Buddha) you preach is the truth.'
The voice was of Taho Nyorai. Taho Nyorai opened half of his seat and urged Sakyamuni to sit next to him. Sakyamuni entered into the hoto and sat down with Taho Nyorai and continued preaching.
Taho Nyorai who in the past, reached enlightenment by the teachings of Hoke-kyo Sutra in the land called Treasure Purity in the east pledged to himself, 'If there's anyone anywhere in the world who preaches Hoke-kyo Sutra, I will appear with a hoto and prove its truthfulness.'

Based on this anecdote, Shaka Nyorai and Taho Nyorai were made in pairs or as seated statues of Shaka Nyorai and Taho Nyorai sitting next to each other on one pedestal.

Nichiren sect/Hokke sect

In the Nichiren sect and Hokke sect, Taho Nyorai is valued second to Shaka Nyorai, as a Buddha who proves the truthfulness of Hoke-kyo Sutra, and the way of enshrinement called, 'itto ryoson' to place Shaka Nyorai and Taho Nyorai on both sides of a hoto is often seen.

Other than Nichiren sect/Hokke sect

Regarding relics other than the Nichiren sect and Hokke sect in Japan, statues of Shaka Nyorai and Taho Nyorai (the Tang period) which are enshrined in the center pagoda of Todai-ji Kaidan-in Temple in Nara are known. Regarding examples made in China, there is a pair of seated bronze statues of Shaka Nyorai and Taho Nyorai owned by Nezu Museum in Tokyo, which has an inscription of 'Taiwa 13' (in 489) of the Northern Wei Dynasty in China and this is valuable as a criterion which identifies the age of the work.

Tahoto pagoda (a "multi-treasure" pagoda)

Refer to Tahoto