Kagutsuchi (カグツチ)

Kagutsuchi is the god of fire that appears in Kiki-shinwa (the Kojiki, Nihonshoki and mythology). Kojiki (The Records of Ancient Matters) describes it as Hinoyagihayao no Kami, Hinokakabiko no Kami, or Hinokagutsuchi no Kami. Nihonshoki (Chronicles of Japan) also describes it as Kagutsuchi or Homusubi.

Description in mythologies
Kagutsuchi is a god born between Izanagi and Izanami. Because Kagutsuchi was a god of fire, Izanami suffered a burn on her pubic region in giving birth. This resulted in her death.
Furious at this, Izanagi then killed Kagutsuchi with Totsuka no Tsurugi (the Sword Ten Hands Long) called 'Amenoohabari.'

According to Kojiki, many gods were born from its blood, which are listed below.

Iwasaku no Kami
Nesaku no Kami
Iwatsutsu no Okami
The three gods above were created when the blood dropped from the distal tip of Totsuka no Tsurugi on a rock.

Mikahayahi no Kami
Hihayahi no Kami
Takemikazuchi no Onokami
It is also known as Takefutsu no Kami or Toyofutsu no Kami. These three gods were created when the blood dropped from the root of Totsuka no Tsurugi on a rock.

Kuraokami no Kami
Kuramitsuha no Kami
These two gods were created when the blood dropped from the handle of Totsuka no Tsurugi on a rock.

In addition, the following gods were born out of the body of Kagutsuchi.

Masakayamatsumi no Kami (born from the head of Kagutsuchi)
Odoyamatsumi no Kami (born from the chest of Kagutsuchi)
Okuyamatsumi no Kami (born from the belly of Kagutsuchi)
Kurayamatsumi no Kami (born from the sexual organ of Kagutsuchi)
Shigiyamatsumi no Kami (born from the left hand of Kagutsuchi)
Hayamatsumi no Kami (born from the right hand of Kagutsuchi)
Harayamatsumi no Kami (born from the left foot of Kagutsuchi)
Toyamatsumi no Kami (born from the right foot of Kagutsuchi)

Gods' names
Hinoyagihayao no Kami
"Hi-no " literally means that the god is a god of fire. "Yagi" can be interpreted as 'yaku' (burn) in the modern Japanese. However, it is more appropriate to interpret it as 'the god burning by itself emitting fire' in ancient Japanese. "Haya" was used as a prefix to nouns to show emphasis in ancient Japanese. "Onokami" literally means that the god is a male divine.

In short, Hinoyagihayao no Kami means 'the male god of fire that is burning.'

Hinokakabiko no Kami
"Kaka" is equal to 'kagayaku' (shining) in modern Japanese.
Here it means 'a fire is giving out a light.'
"Biko" is a word equal to "彦," which shows that the god is a male deity.

In short, Hinokakabiko no Kami means 'the male god of fire which is shining.'

Hinokagutsuchi no Kami
"Kagu" is equal to 'kaka,' which means 'shining.'
The way "kagu" represents "shining" remains today for example in words such as 'Kaguya Hime' (Lady Kaguya). "Kagu" has a relation with words in modern language such as 'nioi-wo-kagu' (smell) and 'kaguwashii' (fragrant).
Some suggest that "kagu" here means that 'it carries the smell of something is burning.'
"Tsuchi" can be divided into 'tsu' and 'chi.'
An archaic word, 'tsu' corresponds to a modern word of 'no' used, for example, when we say 'watashi no hon' (my book). In addition, 'chi' is a word that represents supernatural beings such as gods.

In short, Hinokagutsuchi no Kami means 'a god of fire that is shining' or it can be regarded as 'a god of fire that carries the smell of something burning.'

Worship
Worshiped as a god of a fire and the blacksmith god, it is enshrined in Akiba-jinja Shrines throughout Japan including Akihasan-hongu Akiha-jinja Shrine (Hamamatsu City, Shizuoka Prefecture), Atago-jinja Shrine, and Nonomiya-jinja Shrines (Ukyo Ward, Kyoto City; Minato Ward, Tokyo; Sakai City, Osaka Prefecture and other regions). Some suggest that Odaki-jinja Shrine in Yasuki City, Shimane Prefecture has also something to do with this god.