Takiri-bime (タキリビメ)

Takiri-bime (also known as Tagiri-hime) is a Shinto goddesses from Japanese mythology and one of the 'Munakata-Sanjoshin' (the three goddesses enshrined in Munakata-taisha Shrine). In the Kojiki (Records of Ancient Matters), "Takiri-bime" is written "多紀理毘売命", whereas in the Nihonshoki (Chronicles of Japan), the name is recorded as "田心姫"(Tagori-hime) or "田霧姫" (Tagiri-hime). She is also known as Okitsushima-hime, but according to the third addendum to the Nihonshoki, this name is considered to be an alias of Ichikishima-hime.

Description in mythology
When Susanoo (the god of the sea and storms) made a pledge to his sister, Amaterasu (the sun goddess), to prove his sincerity, Amaterasu received a sword from Susanoo and gave birth to three goddesses, known as the 'Munakata-Sanjoshin.'

It was declared that these three goddesses were daughters of Susanoo, because they were born from his sword. It is recorded that these three goddesses were worshiped by people in the Munakata region.
There are some differences between the descriptions in the Kojiki and the Nihonshoki about the order of their birth and where they were enshrined

According to the Kojiki, she was born first, named Takiri-hime (多紀理毘売命) and enshrined in Okitsumiya. Also known as Okitsushima-hime (奥津島比売命).

According to the main text of the Nihonshoki, she was born first, named Tagori-hime (田心姫) and enshrined in Okitsumiya.

According to the first addendum to the Nihonshoki, she was born third, named Tagori-hime (田心姫) and enshrined in Hetsunomiya.

According to the second addendum to the the Nihonshoki, she was born second, named Tagori-hime (田心姫) and enshrined in Nakatsumiya.

According to the third addendum to the Nihonshoki, she was born third, named Tagiri-hime (田霧姫) and enshrined in Hetsunomiya.

She is enshrined as Tagori-hime (田心姫神) in Okitsumiya, one of the shrines that make up Munakata-taisha Shrine.

In the genealogy of Okuninushi in the Kojiki, it is written that she gave birth to Okuninushi's children, Ajisukitakahikone and Shitateru-hime.

Explanation
The 'Takiri' part of her name can be interpreted in two ways; one meaning is 'fog at the sea' and the other is 'rapids,' signifying the swift current of the Amanoyasukawa river.
The word 'Tagori' in the Nihonshoki derives from 'Tagiri.'

There are few shrines that enshrine Takiri-bime alone as an independent goddess; rather, she is enshrined as one of the Munakata-Sanjoshin in several shrines, including Munakata-taisha Shrine and Itsukushima-jinja Shrine. She is also enshrined, along with the other five gods and three goddesses who were born at the time of Susanoo and Amaterasu's pledge, in several shrines such as Hachioji-jinja Shrine.