Toyokumono (トヨクモノ)

Toyokumono is a Shinto deity appearing in the story of the creation of heaven and earth (the Japanese Mythology). He is a god of Kamiyonanayo (Seven Generations). Toyokumono is described as Toyokumono no kami 豊雲野神 in Kojiki (Records of Ancient Matters), and as Toyokumune no mikoto 豊斟渟尊 in Nihonshoki (Chronicles of Japan).

Descriptions in mythology
In Kojiki, Toyokumono was the second one to come into being as Kamiyonanayo following Kuninotokotachi no kami. He was regarded as Hitorigami (a kami which came into being alone) like Kuninotokotachi no kami, and hid himself away just after coming into being.

The main text of Nihonshoki describes that after the creation of heaven and earth, Toyokumune no mikoto was the third one to come into being following Kuninotokotachi no mikoto and Kuninosatsuchi no mikoto, and these three were male deities.

According to Arufumi Vol. 1 (supplement volumes of explanatory notes in Nihonshoki), it was Toyokuninushi no mikoto who was the third one to come into being following Kuninotokotachi no mikoto and Kuninosatsuchi no mikoto; his another names are described as follows: Toyokumuno no mikoto 豊組野尊, Toyokabuno no mikoto 豊香節野尊, Ukabunono toyoko no mikoto 浮経野豊買尊, Toyokunino no mikoto 豊国野尊, Toyokabuno no mikoto 豊野齧尊, Hakokunino no mikoto 葉木国野尊, and Mino no mikoto 見野尊. Since many of their names include the kanji character 'toyo' (豊), they are regarded to have the same divinity as Toyokumono no kami or Toyokumune no mikoto has. From Arufumi Vol. 2 to Vol. 6, there are no god's name, which seems to be identical to this deity.

From this point forward, Toyokumono no kami never appears in any stories of Kojiki and Nihonshoki.

Comments
Since Toyokumono appears only by name in mythology, and there is nothing except his name that offers any clue as to his divinity, and can be interpreted in various ways.

Taking his other name of Toyokunino no mikoto as an example, "Kojikiden" (Commentaries on the Kojiki) describes that the name symbolizes an abundant profitable country.

One theory is that 'Kumo,' 'Kumi,' or 'Kuni' used in his name means 'seclude,' or 'assemble,' symbolizing the way something drifting like floating grease gradually sticks together. Another theory is that 'Kumo' or 'Kumu' used in his name mean 'among the trees,' symbolizing the land where trees grow.