Doshisha University Imadegawa-kochi (同志社大学今出川校地)

Doshisha University Imadegawa-kochi is the campus of Doshisha University. Because Doshisha University calls its campus 'kochi,' Imadegawa-kochi is used as the title of this article.

Imadegawa-kochi was the site of the Satsuma domain residence in the past, and Reizeike Shiguretei Bunko (Shiguretei bunko library of the Reizei family) is located adjacently. Also, the Kyoto Imperial Palace and Shokoku-ji Temple are located at its north and south sides respectively. Five buildings located at Imadegawa-kochi, including Doshisha Chapel and Clarke Memorial Hall, are designated as national important cultural properties. These buildings are being used for lectures, offices, and worship even at present.

Doshisha Junior High School is currently located at Imadegawa-kochi, but the decision was made to integrate it with Doshisha High School, which is located at Iwakura-kochi, in 2010 and use the site of junior high school for the university's facility. Doshisha Women's College of Liberal Arts Imadegawa-kochi, Doshisha Kindergarten and Doshisha Girl's Junior and Senior High School are also located adjacently.

As Doshisha University's Imadegawa-kochi, Shinmachi-kochi and Muromachi-kochi are located in proximity, these three campuses are being used in an integrated fashion and they are often collectively called Imadegawa-kochi.

History

It was initially the campus of Doshisha English School, the predecessor of Doshisha University. Since 1862, the end of the Edo period, the Kyoto residence of the Satsuma domain was located at this place (this place was called Shokoku-ji Temple Nihonmatsu at the time). Under the state of confusion resulting from the Meiji Restoration, Western learning scholar Kakuma YAMAMOTO (the older brother-in-law and collaborator of Jo NIIJIMA, the founder of Doshisha English School) purchased the site of the domain's residence. When Doshisha English School was opened on November 29, 1875, it rented a part of Sasuzane TAKAMATSU's residence (current Niijima's former residence) for classrooms and dormitories. In 1876, about a half year after opening, the land of the current Imadegawa-kochi was donated by Yamamoto and the school moved there and constructed buildings. There were two buildings (first dormitory, second dormitory) initially, and the first floor was used as classrooms while the second floor was used as dormitories. As Doshisha was a school that believed in Christianity, opposition movements were vigorously organized by residents since the social environment in Kyoto was not in favor of Christianity at the time. Under such circumstances, the school concluded an agreement with Kyoto Prefecture which prohibited it from teaching the Bible at Imadegawa-kochi. Then, Jo NIIJIMA bought a bean curd shop located near current Amherst House under his name and taught the Bible at this place instead of at the school. In fact, however, there was a case where teaching the Bible at school was discovered by an official of Kyoto Prefecture and Niijima wrote a letter of apology. Although current buildings of Doshisha are mostly brick, the original buildings were wooden. Doshisha's first brick building was Shoeikan (the oldest brick building in existence in Kyoto), completed in 1884 and donated by the American Board. The second dormitory was moved and reconstructed at Kyotanabe-kochi in 1970's.

Faculties using Imadegawa-kochi

Under graduate schools: Third and fourth academic years of the School of Theology, Faculty of Letters, Faculty of Social Studies, Faculty of Law, Faculty of Economics, and Faculty of Commerce as well as all academic years of the Faculty of Policy Studies
Graduate schools: Graduate School of Theology, Graduate School of Letters, Graduate School of Social Studies, Graduate School of Law, Graduate School of Economics, Graduate School of Commerce, Graduate School of American Studies, and Graduate School of Policy and management
School of Theology and Faculty of Social Studies were moved into Imadegawa-kochi in 2009. Psychology Department of Faculty of Letters was reorganized into Faculty of Psychology and its all academic years was moved to Kyotanabe-kochi in 2009. Faculty of Letters, Faculty of Law, Faculty of Economics, and Faculty of Commerce are also expected to be moved into Imadegawa-kochi by 2013.

Education facilities

Kofukan (the abbreviated title is K)
Office of the Faculty of Economics, Office of the Faculty of Law, classrooms
Shiseikan (the abbreviated title is S)
Office of the Faculty of Commerce, classrooms
Shingakukan (an abbreviated title is G)
Office of the School of Theology, classrooms, Shingakukan Chapel
Clarke Memorial Hall (the abbreviated title is CL)
Center for Christian Culture, classrooms, Clarke Chapel
Meitokukan (the abbreviated title is M)
Dining room, shopping booth, classrooms, Education Development Center, Research Support Division, student lounge
Tokushokan (the abbreviated title is T)
Office of the Department of Literature, Faculty of Letters
Hakuenkan (the abbreviated title is H)
Classrooms, library of university and graduate schools, office of International Institutes of American Studies, office of the Graduate School of Policy and Management
Imadegawa Library
EU Information Center is set at the library and it possesses a lot of books and reports relating EU.

Fusokan (the abbreviated title is F)
Research Center for World Wide Business, Research Center for Human Security, Research Center for Social Common Capital, International Center (International Division), Center for Japanese Language and Culture (International Education Division), co-op bookshop
Keimeikan
Institute for the Study of Humanities and Social Sciences, Doshisha Archives Center
Kobunkan (the abbreviated title is KB)
Neiseikan (the abbreviated title is N)
Taishinkan
Center for the Interdisciplinary Study of Monotheistic Religions
Koenkan (the abbreviated title is KE)
Keimeikan

Athletic facilities

Nil

Other facilities

Harris Science Hall
Entrance Examination Center, Public Relations Division, Admissions Office, Alumni Association Division
Yushukan
General Affairs Division
Chienkan
Personnel Division, Accounting Division, Finance Division, Student Affairs Division, Planning Division

Cultural properties

The following are the buildings located at Imadegawa-kochi that are designated as cultural properties.

Important national cultural properties

Following are important national cultural properties designated by the Government of Japan which are located at Imadegawa-kochi.

Buildings

Doshisha Chapel (Imadegawa-kochi)

Letter of designation: Registration No. 1575
Classification: Modern school building
Date of designation: July 1, 1963
Age: 1886
Structure: Brick structure, 316.0 square meters, one-storey building with partial mezzanine and basement, steel sheet roofing
Designed by D.C Green and completed in 1886. American Gothic style brick-build building with steel sheet roofing. Constructed thanks to donations by the American Board. It is the oldest brick Protestant chapel in existence in Japan. Its construction was conducted by Kichibei MIKAMI, who also built the Yushukan.
The stained glass is so beautiful, Roka TOKUTOMI described in his novel "Black eyes and brown eyes" as 'five-colored rays are falling.'
It was designated as an important national cultural property in 1963. It was partly dismantled and repaired from 1987 to 1990. It is still used as a chapel at present and worship is conducted every week. Persons who are related to Doshisha can use it for wedding ceremonies during the weekend. It is the second Doshisha Chapel (the first one was a wooden building).

Yushu-kan (Imadegawa-kochi)

Letter of designation: Registration No. 1575
Classification: Modern school building
Date of designation: May 21, 1979 (exclusive of interior)
Age: 1887
Structure: Brick structure, 352.3 square meters, two-storey above ground and one below, sangawara-buki (clay Sangawara tile roofing)
It was completed in 1887 as Shojakukan Library. At the time of its completion, it was the biggest school library building in Japan. It was designed by D.C. Green. Its construction work was conducted by Kichibei MIKAMI. It was the university's first library. A fire broke out at Yushukan in 1928 when Emperor Showa was staying in Kyoto for the enthronement ceremony. As the Imperial Palace, the venue of enthronement ceremony, was adjacent to Doshisha Imadegawa-kochi, the authority of university was on full alert during the period of enthronement ceremony. Nevertheless, a fire broke out because a big wooden hibachi (heating appliance) in the guard station overheated. The president, directors and auditors of the university at the time resigned from their posts to take responsibility for the above incident. Though Yushukan's framework that survived the fire was expected to be demolished, Goichi TAKEDA, who was engaged in the construction of an adjacent building of Doshisha Girl's School, recommended repairing and preserving it. Eventually, it was preserved by means of installing ferroconcrete walls, 15-centimeter thick on the inside of outer walls. This building was named Yushukan by Danjo EBINA when its role as a library ended.

Harris Science Hall (Imadegawa-kochi)

Letter of designation: Registration No. 1575
Classification: Modern school building
Date of designation: May 21, 1979 (exclusive of interior other than stairs)
Age: 1890
Structure: Brick-build structure, 587.0 square meters, a laboratory is attached to the northeast corner, sangawara-buki roofing
It was constructed with the donations of Harris (Jonathan N. HARRIS) of New London, Connecticut, U.S. It was designed by Hansell (Alex N. HANSELL), a member of Royal Institute of British Architects. It was completed in 1890, and it is a British-style brick building. It was designated as an important national cultural property as of May 21, 1979.

Clarke Memorial Hall (Imadegawa-kochi)

Letter of designation: Registration No. 1575
Classification: Modern school building
Date of designation: May 21, 1979
Age: 1894
Structure: Brick-build structure, 389.4 square meters, asagawara-buki roofing, a tower is attached to the southwest corner, copper sheet roofing
A copy of the architectural specifications and a volume of architectural blueprints were also designated.
It is a German neo-gothic style building, and people relating Doshisha University think that 'its impressive spire is something like a symbol of Doshisha University.'
It was constructed with the donations of 6,000 dollars by Mr. and Mrs. Clarke, who donated this amount in memory of their son Byron Stone Clarke who died at the age of 27. Therefore, the phrase 'THE STUDY OF THE WORD OF GOD WAS DEAR TO HIM' was engraved on the wall of the first floor. It was called Clarke Divinity Hall at the time of its opening in 1894, and it was used as a center for the education and study of theology.
It was designated as an important national cultural property in May 1979 together with its 'architectural blueprints' and 'architectural specifications.'
Its renovation work was conducted from January 2003 to February 2008 at a cost of 1,017.6 million yen. On this occasion, the building was restored to its original state by removing portions that were alternated after its completion. At Doshisha EVE held in 2006, an event was held in which the participants wrote words on doibukiita (a base board for tile roofing) used for the restoration work.

Shoeikan (Doshisha Junior High School)

Letter of designation: Registration No. 1575
Classification: Modern school building
Date of designation: May 21, 1979
Age: 1884
Structure: Brick structure, 276.2 square meters, two-storey, asagawara-buki roofing, a tower is attached to the east corner, a porch is attached to the south entrance, steel sheet roofing
A clock mechanism with a plate bearing an inscription of MAY 5, 1887 was also designated. It was designed by D.C. Green and completed in 1884. It is an American-gothic style brick building with kawara tile roofing. It was constructed with the donations of the American Board. It is the oldest brick building in existence in Kyoto City.

Registered tangible cultural properties

The following are registered tangible cultural properties located at Imadegawa-kochi that are registered by the Government of Japan.

Buildings

Amherst House

Registration Number: 26-0200
Structure: Reinforced concrete structure, three-storey above ground and one below, slate roofing, 343 square meters
Age: 1932
Location: 632 Shokokuji-Monzen-cho, Karasuma Higashi-iru, Imadegawa-dori Street, Kamigyo Ward, Kyoto City, Kyoto Prefecture
Date of registration: November 10, 2005
Date of notice through official gazette: December 5, 2005
Construction work started on November 29, 1931. Completed on March 20, 1932. It is a New England Georgia style building and its characteristic is bilaterally symmetric appearance. Registered as a tangible cultural property on November 10, 2005. It is being used as a students dormitory (Amherst dormitory), but renovation work is being conducted at present. It was designed by William Merrell Vories (W. M. Vories). Construction work was done by Shimizugumi.

Doshisha Keimeikan Honkan

Registration Number: 26-0256
Structure: Brick and reinforced concrete structure, five-storey, slate roofing, 406 square meters
Age: 1920
Location: 602-1 Genbu-cho, Karasuma Higashi-iru, Imadegawa Street, Kamigyo Ward, Kyoto City, Kyoto Prefecture
Date of registration: July 31, 2007
Date of notice through official gazette: August 13, 2007
It was completed in 1920 as a library (university's second university). Designed by William Merrell Vories (W. M. Vories). It was include in 'The list of Japanese cultural properties which U.S shouldn't bomb,' which Dr. Langdon Warner submitted to the U.S Army authority during the World War II. It was renamed 'Keimeikan' when the existing library (university's third library) was completed in December 1973. It was registered as of July 31, 2007.

Doshisha Keimeikan Nishikan

Registration No: 26-0257
Structure: Brick and reinforced concrete structure, four-storey, slate roofing, 153 square meters, a roofed passage is attached
Age: 1915
Location: 602-1 Genbu-cho, Karasuma Higashi-iru, Imadegawa, Kamigyo Ward, Kyoto City, Kyoto Prefecture
Date of registration: July 31, 2007
Date of notice through official gazette: August 13, 2007
It was completed in 1915 as a library (university's second library). It was designed by William Merrell Vories (W. M. Vories). It was renamed 'Keimeikan' when the existing library (university's third library) was completed in December 1973. It was registered in July 31, 2007.

Doshisha Friend Peace House

Registration No: 26-0206
Structure: Two-storey wooden building, kawara tile roofing, 248 square meters
Age: Around 1883 to 1897
Location: 665-1 Somedono-cho, Ishiyakushi-sagaru, Teramachi Street, Kamigyo Ward, Kyoto City, Kyoto Prefecture
Date of registration: March 2, 2006
Date of notice through official gazette: March 23, 2006
It used to be the Hawaii Dormitory of Doshisha University, and it is currently used as Doshisha Friend Peace House.

Access

Nearby Imadegawa Station of the Karasuma Line of Kyoto Municipal Subway
A five to six minute-walk from Demachiyanagi Station of Keihan Oto Line.