Otori-zukuri style (大鳥造)

Otori-zukuri style is one of the architectural styles of shrines in Japan.

Structures

Similarly to taisha-zukuri style, otori-zukuri style architecture is square-shaped with an area of approximately 3.6 sq.m., but without a veranda (a narrow wooden passageway along the edge of a house facing the garden) or the sacred core pillar installed at the center of the main sanctuary of a shrine. The entrance is located at the center on the front, and the inside is divided into a naijin (inner sanctuary of a shrine or temple) and a gejin (part of the main sanctuary outside the innermost sanctum of a shrine) with a shinza (seat of the deity) situated at the center of the naijin.

Otori-zukuri style employs kirizuma-zukuri style (an architectural style with a gabled roof) with a Tsuma-iri (entrance on gable side), and many have more linear roofs than those of taisha-zukuri style.

Roofs

The roofs are not necessarily thatched; there are wide varieties, from kokerabuki (a roof covering made with a layer of thin wooden shingles made of cypress) to hiwadabuki (cypress bark roof).

The hafu (a barge board) on the front that supports the roof is decorated with a gegyo (decorative wooden board used to cover the ridge and purlin ends on a roof gable).

Pillars

The architecture is square-shaped with an area of approximately 3.6 sq.m. without the sacred core pillar installed at the center of the main sanctuary of a shrine, or pillars at the center on the front.

Walls

A double-door opening is provided at one location, at the center on the front.

Floors

The floor is lower than those of taisha-zukuri style and shinmei-zukuri style.