Ancient Chinese Chromatic Scale (primarily used in Japan for gagaku, etc.) (十二律)

Ancient Chinese chromatic scale is the twelve kinds of average pitch that are used in Chinese or Japanese traditional music. These are the twelve tones arranged at intervals of semitone, which is not a temperament, within an octave, using the principle of the sanfen sunyi. Ritsu (melody) originally refers to a bamboo tube that determines the tone, and the twelve kinds of music pitch were set based on the difference between the bamboo tubes. It was established in the Zhou period.

The following is the Ritsu of China that are placed in the order of lowest to highest, in comparison with the pitch name of western music (Kosho [the first note of the ancient chromatic scale]; the reference tone, is set at C). (this is only as a guide as it varies depending on the period).

Kosho (the first note of the ancient chromatic scale)
C
Tairyo (the second note of the ancient chromatic scale)
C♯/D♭
Taiso (the third note of the ancient chromatic scale)
D
Kyosho (the fourth note of the ancient chromatic scale)
E♭/D♯
Kosen (the fifth note of the ancient chromatic scale)
E
Churyo (the sixth note of the ancient chromatic scale)
F
Suihin (the seventh note of the ancient chromatic scale)
F♯/G♭
Rinsho (the eighth note of the ancient chromatic scale)
G
Isoku (the ninth note of the ancient chromatic scale)
A♭/G♯
Nanryo (the tenth note of the ancient chromatic scale)
A
Bueki (the eleventh note of the ancient chromatic scale)
B♭/A♯
Osho (the twelfth note of the ancient chromatic scale)
B

Ancient Chinese Chromatic Scale is divided into yin and yang (positive and negative, or light and shade). The odd numbered Ritsu is the Yan tune, and individually called the Ritsu, and are collectively called the Rikuritsu. The even-numbered Ritsu is the Yin tune and individually called the Ryo, and are collectively called the Rikuryo. The name of Ritsu Ryo came from this.

In Japan, D is called the ichikotsu (in Japan, the first note of the ancient chromatic scale [approx. D]), and the following is called the tangin (the second note of the ancient Japanese chromatic scale), hyojo (the third note of the ancient Japanese chromatic scale), shozetsu (the fourth note of the ancient Japanese chromatic scale), simomu (the fifth note of the ancient Japanese chromatic scale), sojo (the sixth note of the ancient chromatic scale), fusho (the seventh note of the ancient Japanese chromatic scale), oshiki (the eighth note of the ancient Japanese chromatic scale), rankei (the ninth note of the ancient Japanese chromatic scale), banshiki (the tenth note of the ancient Japanese chromatic scale), shinsen (the eleventh note of the ancient Japanese chromatic scale), and kamimu (the twelfth note of the ancient Japanese chromatic scale) in sequence.