Kiraibashi (嫌い箸)

Kiraibashi, also called Imibashi or Kinjibashi, is the banned usage of chopsticks in Japan. Generally it is considered to be discourteous.

Kiraibashi as to the way to hold chopsticks
Nigiribashi
To eat by gripping a pair of chopsticks in one hand.

Ogamibashi
To hold chopsticks between the palms and to pray.

Yokobashi
To grip a pair of chopsticks in parallel in one hand to lift food by using them just like a spoon. To lick chopsticks.

Chigaibashi
To use a pair of chopsticks each of which is of different kind and/or material.

Kiraibashi as to usage
Tsukibashi or Sashibashi
To spear food by chopsticks.

Hotokebashi
To make chopsticks stand on rice by pinking. It is the way to offer rice to the dead at a Buddhist funeral rite.

Awasebashi
To pass food with one pair of chopsticks to another. Avoided because it reminds us of picking up funeral ashes. Also called Hiroibashi or Hashiwatashi.

Tatakibashi
To make noise by hitting eating utensils with chopsticks, or to call a person with the noise.

Sashibashi
To point a person or a thing with chopsticks.

Mochibashi
To pick up an eating utensil by the hand having chopsticks.

Ukebashi
To ask for a second bowl of cooked rice, while holding chopsticks in your hand.

Yosebashi
To pull the dish closer with chopsticks.

Karabashi
To put chopsticks without eating food in spite of having touched the food once with the chopsticks. As important people used to do so in old times, it can be considered as the behavior of suspecting the food is poisoned.

Mayoibashi
To move chopsticks here and there over food, hesitating which food to eat. Also called 'Madoibashi'.

Utsuribashi
After holding out the chopsticks to one food, to move chopsticks to the other food suddenly. To move chopsticks to other food without eating one food after putting the chopsticks on it. Also called 'Wataribashi'.

Seseribashi
To poke food here and there with chopsticks.

Namidabashi
To drip liquid of soup or the like from the tips of chopsticks.

Saguribashi
To fumble for food remaining at the bottom of a soup bowl with chopsticks.

Araibashi
To clean chopsticks in soup or the like.

Mogibashi
To remove the rice or the like adhering to the chopsticks with one's mouth. It is considered as a good manner to take a sip of soup as the start of a meal to avoid Mogibashi.

Neburibashi
To suck chopsticks.

Kuwaebashi
To have chopsticks in one's mouth.

Kamibashi
To bite chopsticks.

Kakibashi
To put food into one's mouth directly from an eating utensil with chopsticks, or to scratch one's head or the like with chopsticks.

Komibashi
To thrust food into one's mouth with chopsticks.

Watashibashi
To put chopsticks on an eating utensil across its edges during a break.

Soroebashi
To tap chopsticks on utensils, etc. to line up the tips of chopsticks.

Jikabashi
To take food from a platter not with the common chopsticks but with personal chopsticks. To friends or on the occasion where a host wants the guests to feel free to eat a lot, the host sometimes suggest them 'Jikabashi' purposely.

Sukashibashi
After having finished eating fish meat on the upper side, to pick the meat on the back side through the fish bones with chopsticks.

Hanebashi
To move unfavorite food aside with chopsticks.

Kasanebashi
To keep eating the same food. Also called 'Bakkaritabe'.