Nerigashi (a confection made from kneaded beans, rice, or rice powder) (練り菓子)

Nerigashi (a confection made from kneaded beans, rice, or rice powder) is also referred to as 'konashi,' which is a snack food produced by mixing an ingredient in the form of powder or grain and an ingredient in the form of liquid or paste, applying external forces for many times to homogenize the distribution, and finishing it in a clayey state of plastic deformation.

Some can be eaten as they are, and others must be steamed before eating, depending on the nature of the ingredients. Most of Japanese sweets called fresh (and moist) sweets are nerigashi. Rice cake is produced by a similar production method, but it is often regarded as staple diet and not included in nerigashi.

Komeko (rice powder), hattaiko (flour of roasted barley), soybean flour, and sugar are often used as the powder ingredients; sesame, walnuts are often used as the grain ingredients; pastes such as red-bean jam are often used as the paste-like ingredients; and hot water, tea, milk, and grated potatoes are often used as the liquid ingredients.

Examples of Japanese nerigashi

Yokan (azuki-bean jelly)

Sweet mochi cake

Kyoto Prefecture

Akegarasu (literary; the cawing of a crow at daybreak)

Iwate Prefecture

Karasumi (sweets)

Aichi Prefecture

Midian sweets

Taiwan

Luk chup (miniature sparkling candies shaped like fruits)

Kingdom of Thailand

Golla kambu

Indonesia

Mithai

India

Europe

Sweet potato

Marzipan

Germany

Mazapan

Spain