Sekimon Shingaku (popularized blend of Buddhist, Shinto and Confucian ethical teachings) (石門心学)

Sekimon Shingaku is a school of ethics established by Baigan ISHIDA (1685-1744), a Japanese thinker in the middle of the Edo period. It is also called Shingaku (Mind school) for short. In the beginning, it was spread mainly in urban areas, and gradually became popular in agricultural communities and among samurais. In the late Edo period, it was all the fashion and spread nationwide. However, it fell into a decline in the Meiji period.

Summary
Its philosophy is based on the theory for unification of the three religions of Shinto, Confucianism and Buddhism. The basis of its philosophy of practical morality is to bring your heart into oneness with the spirit of the universe, to be selfless, to achieve a state of mind that is free from delusion, and to observe a code of humanity and justice. What it respects most is the virtue of honesty.

The places where lectures on Shingaku teachings were given to the common people and Shingaku scholars continued their training (Kaiho or support meeting) were the facilities which were called Shingaku kosha (Shingaku Schools). The first one was Gorakusha that was founded by Toan TEJIMA in 1765. At its peak, there were more than 180 Shingaku koshas around the country.

Main Shingaku scholars
Baigan ISHIDA
Toan TEJIMA
Shoo FUSE
Doni NAKAZAWA
Kisui UEKAWA
Kyuo SHIBATA
Main Shingaku schools
Kyoto
Gorakuha
Shuseisha
Jishusha
Meirinsha (central college of Shingaku)
Kyoukeisha
Osaka
Meiseisha
Edo
Sanzensha