Shoei Makino Kinema (正映マキノキネマ)

Shoei Makino Kinema (established in February 1932, liquidated in April) was a film company that existed in Kyoto. Masatsugu TAKAMURA and Ryosuke TACHIBANA established this company aspiring for 'the revival of Makino' at the 'Omuro Studio' constructed by Shozo MAKINO, but it was liquidated in two months due to financial difficulties.

Brief history/summary

In February of 1932, Masatsugu TAKAMURA of Taishu Bungei Eiga-sha and Ryosuke TACHIBANA, who had been the senior managing director of Teikoku Kinema half a year prior, established 'Shoei Makino Kinema' at 'Omuro Studio' by making a joint business with the 'Makino family.'
The studio was named 'Shoei Makino Studio' and Shozo MAKINO's wife, Chieko (died in 1929), became the head of the studio.

The studio was burnt down, however, due to an unknown cause. Director Masahiro Makino, Makino's oldest son, filmed "Nabante Ako Roshi" and other films using a hastily built studio, but the company was unable to secure a distribution network and was liquidated two months later due to financial difficulties. Distribution rights of "Nibante Ako Roshi" were assigned to Nikkatsu and proceeds from the sales were used to pay employee severance allowances. Shoei Makino Kinema partnered with Taishu Bungei Eiga-sha to produce "Adauchi Kyodai Kagami", directed by Taizan GOTO, and released it on May 12 of the same year together with "Kenka Dochi-ki", produced by 'Shoei Makino Kinema' and directed by Masao AOYAMA through the distribution network of 'Kokusai Eiga-sha', a western film distribution company managed by Tsusai SUGAWARA. All the films that were produced were silent films.

Half a year later, Masatsugu TAKAMURA took over Toa Kinema that had given up film production, established Takarazuka Kinema Kogyo at Omuro in partnership with Kisaburo MINAMI, who had resigned as the president of Toa, changed 'Omuro Studio' to 'Takarazuka Kinema Studio' and put it into operation.
The new company hired the former employees of 'Shoei Makino Kinema.'