Tejime (手締め)

Tejime is a Japanese custom of rhythmic hand clapping performed in time with the calls of one participant in order to celebrate the fact that an event has concluded without trouble. It is also called teuchi. It is done at the end of events including festivals, ceremonial occasions, business discussions and general shareholders meetings.

The sound of tejime is expressed 'shan shan.'
A general meeting of stockholders ending in a short time without any particular questions and answers is ridiculed as a 'shan shan sokai' (shan shan meeting), since the participants have done nothing but performed tejime.

Summary

The origin of the word 'tejime' is 'to conclude with the clapping of hands.'
In Kansai region, 'tejime' is referred to as 'teuchi.'

The main reason for performing tejime is as a thanks from the host to the participants for making the occasion a success. It is for this reason that it is proper for a guest to decline if requested to lead the tejime.

Edo-jime (Edo-style Tejime)
Tejime consists of different rhythms, numbers of claps and calls depending on the region. Variations are generally divided into Edo-jime and Osaka-jime. Of these, Edo-jime is widely used throughout the country and the most fundamental form of tejime.

Edo-jime consists of ippon-jime and sanbon-jime. It is said that a sequence of three claps followed by one final clap (3-3-3-1) are used because 3+3+3=9 (九 in Japanese) and the addition of an extra clap makes a circle (丸) which signifies 'maruku osamaru' (lit. to be settled amicably).

Calls such as 'iyoo,' 'yo,' and 'mouichho' are made before clapping and between clapping sequences before a final clapping sequence. The call 'iyoo' is said to have derived from 'iwaou' (lit. let us celebrate).

Ippon-jime
Three sets of three claps and one final clap (3-3-3-1).
General flow
"Ote wo haishaku" (please lend me your hands)
"Iyoo-o" clap-clap-clap, clap-clap-clap, clap-clap-clap, clap
"Arigato gozaimashita" (thank you very much), applause

Sanbon-jime
Three sets of ippon-jime.

General flow
"Ote wo haishaku"
"Iyoo-o" clap-clap-clap, clap-clap-clap, clap-clap-clap, clap
"Iyoo" clap-clap-clap, clap-clap-clap, clap-clap-clap, clap
"Iyoo" clap-clap-clap, clap-clap-clap, clap-clap-clap, clap
"Arigato gozaimashita," applause

Iccho-jime
As a variation of ippon-jime there is also the iccho-jime variation which consists of a single clap. This is sometimes confused with 'ippon-jime,' but is a simplified form of tejime. Some people call it 'Kanto ippon-jime' but there are many who are unaware of 'iccho-jime' and confuse the two.

General flow
"Ote wo haishaku"
"Iyoo-o" clap
"Arigato gozaimashita," applause

Regional tejime variations
In addition to Osaka-jime which is widely performed in western Japan, different regions each have their own tejime variations.

Osaka-jime
Osaka-jime is the tejime variation mainly performed in Osaka.

In Osaka, it is called 'teuchi.'

General flow
"Uuchimahyo" (let us clap) clap clap
"Mohitotsuse" (once more) clap clap
"Iwaute sando" (celebrate three times) clap clap
"Omedeto gozaimasu" (congratulations), applause

Hakata Teippon
In Hakata City in Fukuoka City, Fukuoka Prefecture, a specific form of tejime called 'Hakata Teippon' is conducted. It is performed at the Hakata Gion Yamagasa summer festival, as well events including the grand opening and closing ceremonies of the Fukuoka Stock Exchange, public and private ceremonies, and the conclusion of business deals. Teippon has the implication that no subsequent objections will be raised.

General flow
"Yoo" clap clap
"Mahitotsusho" (once more) clap clap
"Iwaute sando" clap clap
Sometimes 'mahitotsusho' is pronounced 'mohitotsu,' and 'iwoutesando' is pronounced 'yotesando' or 'yotesan.'

Date no Ippon-jime
There is also tejime related to Masamune DATE.

To fulfill Masamune's dream to become a 'sangokuichi no busho' (literally, "the best military commander in the three provinces"), this tejime, having the form of three and one (meaning three provinces and one commander), naturally began to be performed among his vassals at meetings.

It is said that this tejime was performed at the wedding ceremony of the first daughter of Masamune, Princess Iroha, and also at the departure of 'Keicho era mission to Europe,' in which people such as Tsunenaga HASEKURA joined, in 1613.

In and after the Edo period, from the meaning of it, it became not to be performed in public out of consideration for the bakufu, and was passed down for generations by 'Entsu-in Temple' in Matsushima-cho, Miyagi Prefecture.

It is now starting to become popular in Sendai City among practitioners of the 'Sendai Suzume Odori' (Sendai sparrow dance).

General flow
"Yoo" clap clap
"Yoo" clap

Others
Unique forms of tejime are also performed in the western part of Tama district in Tokyo in western Kanto region (former Nishitama district), western Saitama Prefecture (former Iruma, Chichibu, Hiki, and Kodama districts), and western Gunma Prefecture (former Tano and Kanra districts).

First
Ntantan tattattan tan
Ntantan tattattan tan
Ntantan tattattan tan
Second
Ntantan tattattan tan tan
Ntantan tattattan tan tan
Ntantan tattattan tan tan
Third (Bushu [Musashi Province] Kawagoe-jime)
Tantantan tantantan tan
Fourth (Chichibu-jime)
Shanshanshan shanshanshan shan