Jikimiyake (直宮家)

Jikimiyake refers to a Miyake (family allowed to have the status of Imperial family) which was established by a child of an emperor. The Miyake which have been established by the present Emperor are considered to have the highest social status. The present highest-rank Miyake is the Akishinonomiya family. Normally when an Imperial Prince gets married, a Miyake is established with him as its head.
Examples

Since Meiji Era the following are considered to be Jikimiya in the modern Imperial family.

The Jikimiyake of Emperor Meiji
Refer to Emperor Meiji.

No Jikimiyake were established because among his five sons, four died young, leaving only Emperor Taisho. Emperor Taisho was the third Imperial prince and was supposed to be the head of one of Jikimiyakes, but became the Crown Prince because his two older brothers had died young. His two younger brothers also died, and so no Miyake was established.

Jikimiyake of Emperor Taisho
Refers to Emperor Taisho.

All are Emperor Showa's younger brothers.

Chichibunomiya: established by Imperial Prince Chichibunomiya Yasuhito, the second imperial prince of Emperor Taisho. In 1995 it became extinct due to the death of Princess Setsuko, the wife of Imperial Prince Yasuhito.

Takamatsunomiya: established by Imperial prince Takamatsunomiya Nobuhito, the third Imperial prince of Emperor Taisho. In 2004 it became extinct due to the death of Princess Kikuko, the wife of Imperial Prince Nobuhito.

Mikasanomiya: established by Imperial Prince Mikasanomiya Takahito (the present head of the family), the fourth imperial prince of Emperor Taisho. Imperial Prince Tomohito is the koshi (heir).

Jikimiyake of Emperor Showa
Refers to Emperor Showa.

Hitachinomiya: established by Imperial Prince Hitachinomiya Masahito, the second imperial prince of Emperor Showa. As of 2007 there is no koshi.

Jikimiyake of the present Emperor
Refers to Akihito. Akishinonomiya: the highest-rank Miyake at this moment. It has been established by Imperial Prince Akishinonomiya Fumihito (who is presently the head of the family), the second Imperial prince of the present Emperor. Imperial Prince Hisahito is the koshi.

Remarks
In cases where the Crown Prince has his own imperial princes, his eldest son becomes the Crown Prince when his father is enthroned, but imperial princes other than the eldest son do not necessarily establish an independent Miyake at the time of their father's enthronement.