Tanba-Kameyama Domain (丹波亀山藩)

The Kameyama Domain was a feudal domain in Tanba Province during the Edo period. It was located in present-day Kameoka City, Kyoto Prefecture. Kameyama was greatly valued by the Edo bakufu (Japanese feudal government headed by a shogun) as it served as the gateway to a region of Japan known as the Sanin-do. As Kameyama was renamed Kameoka in the Meiji period, the area is also known as the Kameoka Domain. Kameyama Castle (Tanba Province) was the domain's seat of power.

Summary

When Mitsuhide AKECHI was ordered to conquer the Tanba region by Nobunaga ODA, he first advanced into the Kameyama Basin. In 1577, Mitsuhide entered the domain and built Tanba-Kameyama-jo Castle, marking the beginning of the early-modern times of Kameoka. When Mitsuhide defeated Hideharu HATANO in 1579 and Tanba was ceded to Nobunaga ODA, Nobunaga gave him Sakamoto-jo Castle in Omi Province and the whole of Tanba Province for his military achievement. In June 1582 Mitsuhide caused the Honnoji Incident and killed Nobunaga, but was himself defeated by Nobunaga's vassal, Hideyoshi HASHIBA (Hideyoshi TOYOTOMI), a defeat which led to the demise of the Akechi clan.

In the subsequent Kiyosu Meeting, Hideyoshi HASHIBA seized power from the Oda clan, and Hidekatsu HASHIBA (Otsugi), Nobunaga's fourth son who had been adopted by Hideyoshi, then entered the Kameyama-jo Castle. When Hidekatsu died young in 1585, Hideyoshi's nephew, Hidekatsu TOYOTOMI (Kokichi) took over the domain. In 1590, Ieyasu TOKUGAWA was transferred to a new domain in the Kanto Region, and Hidekatsu TOYOTOMI took over Kai, whereupon various other warlords came and went in a short period of time. Hideaki HASHIBA (Hideaki KOBAYAKAWA) who was Hideyoshi's nephew and another one of his adopted children was one of these.

In 1595, Geni MAEDA who was the Kyoto Shoshidai, or Governor, under the Toyotomi regime took over Kameyama-jo Castle. At the battle of Sekigahara in 1600, Geni MAEDA who had unwillingly joined the Western Forces was secretly in touch with Ieyasu and was given assurances that he would receive the domain after the battle; thus, the domain of Tanba-Kameyama was established. After the death of Geni MAEDA in May 1602, his son, Shigekatsu, succeeded him, but Shigekatsu was transferred to the new domain of Tanba-Yakami, and the Tanba-Kameyama Domain became a shogunal demesne (a territory held directly by the Tokugawa shogun).

In 1609, when Nagamori OKABE, a hereditary vassal of the Tokugawa house, was transferred from the Shimousa-Yamazaki Domain to Tanba-Kameyama, the Tanba-Kameyama Domain was reestablished. Having Nagamori take over the Kameyama Domain was one of the measures against Hideyori TOYOTOMI in the Osaka Domain. In 1610, the construction of Kameyama Castle began with the combined efforts of all the daimyo (Japanese territorial lord) of western provinces.

In 1621, Narushige MATSUDAIRA of the Ogyu-Matsudaira family from the Nishio Domain in Mikawa Province became the lord of the Kameyama Domain with assigned revenues of 22,000 koku.

In 1634, Sadayoshi SUGANUMA from the Zeze Domain in Omi Province took over Kameyama with assigned revenues of 41,000 koku, but the second lord, Sadaakira SUGANUMA had no heir and died in 1648, and consequently, the Suganuma clan forfeited their territories. Tadaharu MATSUDAIRA of the Fujii-Matsudaira family then took over Kameyama with assigned revenues of 38,000 koku, but the family was transferred to the Iwatsuki Domain in Musashi Province in the era of Tadachika MATSUDAIRA.

In 1685, Shigeyuki KUZE took over Kameyama with assigned revenues of 50,000 koku from the Niwase Domain in Bicchu Province, but the family was soon transferred to the Yoshida Domain in Mikawa Province.

In 1697, Masamine INOUE from the Gujo Domain in Mino Province took over Kameyama with assigned revenues of 47,000 koku, but his family was also quickly transferred, in their case to the Shimodate Domain in Hitachi Province.

In September 7, 1702, Tadashige AOYAMA from the Hamamatsu Domain in Totomi Province took over Kameyama with assigned revenues of 50,000 koku, but the family did not stay long, the third lord, Tadatomo AOYAMA being transferred to the Sasayama Domain in Tanba Province.

After Nobumine MATSUDAIRA of the Katahara-Matsudaira family replaced the Aoyama clan as the lord of the Kameyama Domain in 1749, Matsudaira family took charge for generations. In the Boshin War of 1868, the Kameyama Domain surrendered to an agent of the new government. In 1869 it was renamed the domain of Kameoka. In July 1871, with the abolition of feudal domains and establishment of prefectures, the domain of Kameoka became Kameoka Prefecture. In November 1871 it was incorporated into Kyoto Prefecture.

The chronological order of the Lords.
The Maeda Family
The tozama daimyo (the allied daimyo of the Tokugawa shogun)
50,000 koku
1600 - 1602

Geni MAEDA
Shigekatsu MAEDA

The Okabe family
The fudai daimyo (the daimyo in hereditary vassalage to the Tokugawa house)
32,000 koku
1609 - 1621

Nagamori OKABE [Jyugoige-Naizen-no-kami, Director of Imperial Cuisine, (Junior Fifth Rank, Lower Grade)]

The Matsudaira (Ogyu) family
The fudai daimyo of 22,000 koku (1621 - 1634)
Narishige MATSUDAIRA [Jugoinoge Ukon no jo, Captain of the Imperial Guard of the Right, (Junior Fifth Rank, Lower Grade)]
Tadaaki MATSUDAIRA (the Ogyu-Matsudaira family) [Jugoinoge Shinano no kami, Governor of Shinano Province, (Junior Fifth Rank, Lower Grade)]

The Suganuma family
The fudai daimyo of 41,000 koku (1634 - 1648)
Sadayoshi SUGANUMA [Jugoinoge Oribe no kami, Director of Wooven Stuff Office, (Junior Fifth Rank, Lower Grade)]
Sadaakira SUGANUMA [Jugoinoge Sakon no jo, Captain of the Imperial Guard of the Left, (Junior Fifth Rank, Lower Grade)]

The Matsudaira (Fujii) family
The fudai daimyo of 38,000 koku (1648 - 1685)
Tadaharu MATSUDAIRA [Jugoinoge Iga no kami, Governor of Iga Province, (Junior Fifth Rank, Lower Grade)]
Tadaaki MATSUDAIRA (the Fujii-Matsudaira family) [Jugoinoge Iga no kami, Governor of Iga Province, (Junior Fifth Rank, Lower Grade)]
Tadachika MATSUDAIRA [Jugoinoge Iga no kami, Governor of Iga Province, (Junior Fourth Rank, Lower Grade)]

The Kuze family
The fudai daimyo of 50,000 koku (1685 - 1697)
Shigeyuki KUZE [Jushiinoge Yamato no kami Jiju, Governor of Yamato Province and Chamberlain, (Junior Fourth Rank, Lower Grade)]

The Inoue family
The fudai daimyo of 47,000 koku (1697 - 1702)
Masamine INOUE [Jushiinoge Kawachi no kami Jiju, Governor of Kawachi Province and Chamberlain, (Junior Fourth Rank, Lower Grade)]

The Aoyama family
The fudai daimyo of 50,000 koku (1702 - 1749)
Tadashige AOYAMA [Jugoinoge Inba no kami, Governor of Inba Province, (Junior Fifth Rank, Lower Grade)]
Toshiharu AOYAMA [Jugoinoge Inba no kami, Governor of Inba Province (Junior Fifth Rank, Lower Grade)]
Tadatomo AOYAMA [Jugoinoge Inba no kami, Governor of Inba Province, (Junior Fifth Rank, Lower Grade)]

The Matsudaira (Katahara) family
The fudai daimyo of 50,000 koku (1749 - 1871)
Nobumine MATSUDAIRA [Jushiinoge Kii no kami, Governor of Kii Province, (Junior Fourth Rank, Lower Grade)]
Nobunao MATSUDAIRA [Jugoinoge Kii no kami, Governor of Kii Province, (Junior Fifth Rank, Lower Grade)]
Nobumichi MATSUDAIRA [Jugoinoge Kii no kami, Governor of Kii Province, (Junior Fifth Rank, Lower Grade)]
Nobukata MATSUDAIRA [Jugoinoge Kii no kami, Governor of Kii Province, (Junior Fifth Rank, Lower Grade)]
Nobuzane MATSUDAIRA [Jugoinoge Kii no kami, Governor of Kii Province, (Junior Fifth Rank, Lower Grade)]
Nobuhide MATSUDAIRA [Jugoinoge Kii no kami, Governor of Kii Province, (Junior Fifth Rank, Lower Grade)]
Nobuyoshi MATSUDAIRA [Jushiinoge Kii no kami Jiju, Governor of Kii Province and Chamberlain, (Junior Fourth Rank, Lower Grade)]
Nobumasa MATSUDAIRA [Jugoinoge Zusho no kami, Head of the Document Office, (Junior Fifth Rank, Lower Grade)]