Sechi-e (節会)

The term "Sechi-e" means official events held at the Japanese Imperial Court on the day of Sekku (seasonal festivals) etc. with the attendance of the Emperor and a large number of his subjects. Sechi-e were accompanied by banquets.

The main Sechi-e

The history of Sechi-e dates back to the time before the Nara period (the time when Japan was under the Ritsuryo system).

Gantan no sechi-e (a seasonal court banquet, held on the first of January)
Hakuba no sechi-e (a seasonal court banquet, held on the seventh of January)
Toka no sechi-e (an Imperial Court Ceremony, held on the sixteenth of January)
Joshi no sechi-e (an Imperial Court Ceremony, held on the third of March)
Tango no sechi-e (an Imperial Court Ceremony, held on the fifth of May)
Sumai no sechi-e (an Imperial ceremony of Sumo wrestling, held on the seventh of July or in the latter half of July)
Choyo no sechi-e (an Imperial Court Ceremony, which held on the ninth of September)
Toyoakari no sechi-e (a seasonal court banquet, held on the day of Dragon, the next day after Niiname-sai festival in November)
Sekiten (a ceremony to worship Confucius held in spring)
Urabon festival (a Festival for the Dead and Buddhist All Soul's Day, around the fifteenth of July or August, depending on the local customs)

Gosechi-e (five seasonal festivals)

Gantan, Hakuba, Toka, Tango, and Toyoakari were particularly emphasized during the Heian period as Gosechi-e.

Gosekku (five seasonal festivals)

The Edo bakufu designated Jinjitsu (one of the five seasonal festivals during the Edo period, held on the seventh of January), Joshi (one of the five seasonal festivals during the Edo period, held on the third of March), Tango (one of the five seasonal festivals during the Edo period, held on the fifth of May), Tanabata (one of the five seasonal festivals during the Edo period, held on the seventh of July) and Choyo (one of the five seasonal festivals during the Edo period, held on the ninth of September) as the days of celebration and emphasized them by calling Gosekku.