Matsudaira Mitsuhiro (松平光煕)

Mitsuhiro MATSUDAIRA (1674 -October 8, 1717) was fudai daimyo (a daimyo in hereditary vassal to the Tokugawa family) during the middle of the Edo Period. He was the lord of Yodo Domain in Yamashiro Province. He was the family head of Toda Matsudaira family (direct descendent of Nirengitoda family), which was the head family of the Toda clan. He was the twentieth generation of the Toda clan. His father was Mitsunaga MATSUDAIRA. His childhood name was Chitora or Magoshiro. He is also called Mitsuhiro TODA.

Yasunaga MATSUDAIRA - Yasunao MATSUDAIRA = Mitsushige MATSUDAIRA - Mitsunaga MATSUDAIRA - Mitsuhiro MATSUDAIRA

In 1674, he was born in Kano, Mino Province. In December 1688, he was appointed to Jugoinoge (Junior Fifth Rank, Lower Grade) Kawachi no kami (governor of Kawachi Province), and in June 1695, he gave a lecture on the Analects of Confucius to the Shogun Tsunayoshi TOKUGAWA, when the Shogun visited Masatake ABE's house. In 1705, he succeeded to the family estate and became the lord of Kano Domain in Mino Province. Then he became Tanba no kami (governor of Tanba Province). In 1706, he visited his domain as the lord, for the first time. By order of the bakufu, he was engaged in building the Imperial Palace in 1708, so in 1709 he was conferred a sword of Hirotsugu and "Shuishu" (collection of poetry), yoriaigaki written by the "Tosho-ke" (hereditary lineage of court nobles occupying relatively high ranks), by the Imperial Court. He also received jifuku (clothes of the season) from the bakufu. In 1711, he was relocated by receiving territories in Yamashiro Province, Kawachi Province, Settsu Province, and Omi Province, and became the lord of Yodo Domain in Yamashiro Province. He died on October 8, 1717. He was forty four years old when he died.

Achievement and Honors

In December 1688, he was appointed to Jugoinoge Kawachi no kami.

In1708, he was engaged in building the Imperial Palace by order of the bakufu.

In 1709, he was conferred a sword of Hirotsugu and "Shuishu", yoriaigaki written by the "Tosho-ke", by the Imperial Court as well as ten jifuku by the bakufu, for his work.