Kansai Main Line (関西本線)

The Kansai Main Line is a railway line (main line) running from Nagoya Station, located in Nakamura Ward, Nagoya City, Aichi Prefecture, to the JR Namba Station, located in Naniwa Ward, Osaka City, Osaka Prefecture, via the Kameyama Station (Mie Prefecture) and the Nara Station. In addition, it has freight line branches between Yokkaichi and the Shiohama Stations as well as between Hirano and the Kudara Stations. Its Nagoya-Kameyama section is managed by the Central Japan Railway Company (JR Central) and the Kameyama-JR Namba section is managed by West Japan Railway Company (JR West).

Summary

The line connects Nagoya and Osaka via the Hokusei and Iga regions of Mie Prefecture and the northern part of Nara Prefecture. Being the shortest line connecting Nagoya and Nara, direct trains used to be operated on the line in the past. Due to the competitions with the Tokaido Main Line, the Tokaido Shinkansen and Kintetsu Limited Express, however, the line is currently being used mainly for interurban transportation/tourists transportation by Rapid and Limited Express between Nagoya and Ise City/Nanki region as well as for interurban transportation/commuters transportation on the electrified sections between Nagoya and Kameyama/Ise in Aichi/Mie Prefecture and Kamo and Osaka in Nara/Osaka Prefecture, rather than the transportation between Nagoya and Nara/Osaka (details of operation are to be mentioned below).

The Tsuge-JR Namba section is included in the metropolitan suburban section. Further, the Nara - JR Namba section is included in the electric car specified section and the Tennoji - JR Namba section is included in the Osaka Loop Line, and the train fare in these sections is less expensive compared with the outside of these sections.

The Kamo - JR Namba section was given the nickname Yamatoji Line in March 1988.

TOICA, JR Central's ticket card, and ICOCA, JR West's ticket card, are usable in the Nagoya - Yokkaichi section and the Kamo -JR Namba section respectively (concerning the mutual use of each company's card, refer to the articles of respective cards). In the latter section, J-Through Card can be redeemed with tickets at the automatic ticket machine.

Data on the line

Jurisdiction and the distnce of the line (business kilometers) : 179.6 km (inclusive of branch lines. 174.9 km for the Nagoya - JR Namba section)

Central Japan Railway Company (railway operator)
Nagoya - Kameyama 59.9 km
West Japan Railway Company (first class railway operator)
Kameyama - JR Namba 115.0 km
Japan Freight Railway Company
Railway operator's section :
Yokkaichi - Shiohama 3.3 km
Hirano - Kudara 1.4 km
Railway operator's section :
Nagoya - Kameyama (59.9 km)
Track gauge: 1067 mm
Number of stations:
Passenger station: 50 (18 for JR Central, 32 for JR West, inclusive of the station of origin and terminal, exclusive of branch lines' stations, Kameyama Station is excluded from the number of JR West)

Freight station: two (exclusive of stations that also handle passengers)
Double track section:
Nagoya - Sasashima Signal Station section
Yatomi - Kuwana section
Asake Signal Station - Tomida section
Tomidahama - Yokkaichi section
Minami-yokkaichi - Kawarada section
Kizu - JR Namba section
Electrified section: Nagoya - Kameyama section, Kamo - JR Namba section (direct current 1500 V)
Block (railway) :
Double track section: Double track automatic block system
Single track sections other than the following: Single track automatic block system
Kameyama - Kamo section: Automatic block system (special)
Yokkaichi - Shiohama section: Tablet block system
Protective device:
Kamo - Oji section: Automatic train stop system (base P system) and automatic train stop system
Oji - JR Namba section: ATS-P (encoder method)
Operation center
Nagoya - kameyama: Tokai General Control Center
Kameyama - Kamo: Kameyama Control Center
Kamo - JR Namba: Shin-Osaka General Control Center (Kamo - Kizu section is a CTC section controlled by Kameyama Control Center)
Maximum speed:
Nagoya - Kawarada section: 120 km/h
Kawarada - Nara section: 95 km/h
Nara - Tennoji section: 120 km/h
Tenoji - JR Namba section: 95 km/h

* Nagoya - Kameyama section is under the jurisdiction of the Central Japan Railway Company, Conventional Lines Operation Division (only Nagoya Station is directly administered by the division, the Hatta - Kameyama section is administered by the Central Japan Railway Company, Mie Branch Office), and Kameyama - JR Namba section is under the jurisdiction of West Japan Railway Company, Osaka Office (the Kamo - JR Namba section is directly administered by the Osaka Office and the Kameyama - Kamo section, excluding the stations on both ends, is administered by the Kameyama Railway Department). Kameyama Station, located on the border of two companies' jurisdiction, is administered by JR Central.

Regional transportation

No trains run through the entire line at present, and the operation is being carried out separately for three sections; namely the Nagoya - Kameyama section of JR Central, the Kameyama - Kamo section, a non-electrified section of JR West, and the Kamo - JR Namba section, an electrified section of JR West.

Nagoya - Kameyama section (JR Central)

Local electric cars run between Nagoya and Kameyama, and all Ise Railway's Local diesel cars run on the Yokkaichi-Kawarada section. During the daytime, all of these Local trains are operated without a conductor. In addition, Rapid "Mie (train)," uses JR CentarlDiesel locomotives Series Kiha seventy-five and run between Nagoya and Toba via the Ise Railway Ise Line, also run on the Nagoya - Kawarada section. Also, Rapid trains using electric cars run between Nagoya and Kameyama, and Regional Rapid trains run between Nagoya and Yokkaichi/Kameyama during rush hours. During the daytime, Rapid and Local trains run twice an hour between Nagoya and Yokkaichi, but only Rapid train runs once an hour (provided that it stops at all stations in this section) between Yokkaichi and Kameyama. Although Rapid electric trains used to run only during the rush hour, Rapid trains that stop at Kuwana and all stations south of Yokkaichi began to run after the timetable was revised in March 2009. At the same time, Rapid trains that stop at Kanie, Yatomi, and all stations south of Kuwana, were renamed Regional Rapid. Some Rapid trains are operated without a conductor during the daytime.

The Kintetsu Nagoya line runs parallel to the line and they are competing between Nagoya and Yokkaichi. Although the line has an advantage in terms of fare, it is under an overwhelming handicap when it comes to acquiring passengers because it still has a single track section, where the number of cars of the train is small and Yokkaichi Station is located far from the city center.

Kameyama - Kamo section (JR West)

The Kameyama - Kamo section is an inactive section, and diesel trains are operated without a conductor. Although some trains went directly to Nara and other sections in the past, all trains have been operating inside the section since March 2001. As the exchange of cars can be accomplished at any station in the section, one train runs hourly during the daytime (departing from Kamo at 10:00 to 15:00) and two trains run during the other time zones (as trains wait for other train's passing, operational intervals at each station are not regular for example; every sixty minutes or every thirty minutes). The operation is less frequent compared with other sections. Since March 2001, operations during the daytime have been suspended once a month on Saturday. Substitute transport by other public transportation, such as bus services, is not provided. Operations were suspended on the fourth Saturday initially, but it was changed to the second Saturday as of April 2005. Operation are not suspended from July to September. All trains operate under a timetable that takes into account connections with the Yamatoji Line's Yamatoji Rapid service, Rapid and Regional Rapid services. In the case of connections with trains going to Nagoya from Kameyama Station, while trains make good connections in the morning and evening, they don't during the daytime and as this resulted in a revision of the timetable as of March 2009 and passengers are required to wait for forty to fifty minutes. Also, trains don't make good connections with the Kusatsu Line at Tsuge.

Kamo -JR Namba section (JR West)

Rapid trains run between Kamo and JR Namba in addition to Local trains, and Yamotoji Rapid and Regional Rapid trains run frequently between Kamo and the Osaka Loop Line. Other than the above, direct trains from the Wakayama Line/Sakurai Line to JR Namba are also operating. Trains of the Nara Line/Katamachi Line are operating on the Kizu - Nara section. Direct trains from JR Namba/Oji to Kyoto via Nara are operating in the early morning, and a few trains operate on the above section to and from Kyoto in the evening, though they are not included in the timetable.

Superior trains

Limited Express "Nanki (train)," running between Nagoya and Kii-Katsuura (via Ise Railway), runs on the Nagoya - Kawarada section. In the past, many superior trains connecting Nagoya and Minatomachi (current JR Namba)/Nanki or Kyoto and Ise, including the Express "Yamato" that ran between Tokyo and Minatomachi/Wakayamashi, ran on the Kawarada - Minatomachi section. The Limited Express "Asuka," that ran on the Nagoya-Yao section of Kansai Main Line, operated for a short period from March 1, 1965 until the revision of the timetable on October 1, 1967. After the Express "Kasuga (train)" was abolished due to the revision of the timetable as of March 18, 2006 (it operated between Nagoya and Nara before its abolition), Limited Express and Express trains have not been operating on the line, except for the Tennoji - Shinimamiya section which is actually a part of the Osaka Loop Line.

Freight trains

Freight trains operate on the Nagoya - Kawarada section, the Yokkaichi - Shiohama section of freight branch line and the Hirano -Kudara section of freight branch line. As for freight trains that operate on the Hirano - Kudara section, refer to the Joto Freight Line of Osaka Higashi Line.

A high speed freight train made up of only container cars makes three round trips a day between the Nagoya Freight Terminal Station and Yokkaichi Station, one round trip a day between the Inazawa Station and Udono Station via the Ise Line of Ise Railway and the Kisei Main Line, and one round trip a day between Yokkaichi Station and Shiohama Station/Minami-yokkaichi Station. Other trains are exclusive freight trains that pull oil tank cars or chemical tank cars. High speed freight trains that are made up of only freight cars of the JR Freight Car Series Taki 1000 are in service between Yokkaichi Station/Shiohama Station and the Inazawa Station (- Minami-Matsumoto Station). Cement transportation is carried out on the Sangi Railway Sangi Line - Tomida Station - Yokkaichi Station section, which is the sole example in the nation.

All trains are pulled by Kokutetsu Diesel Locomotives Type DD51.

History

In this article, the line's history is mainly described. Regarding the history of trains used for the Kansai Main Line, refer to the articles of Kasuga (train) and the Osaka - Nagoya section of Kintetsu Tokkyu-shi (History of Kintetsu Limited Express).

Summary

Operation on the Nagoya - Kizu section was initiated by Kansai Railway Company. After the company began operations on the Nagoya-Tsuge section in 1895, it connected Nagoya and Nara when it began operating the Tsuge-Daibutsu section in 1898 (later abolished). In the same year, the company began operations on the Kamo-Shinkizu (later, it was integrated with Kizu and was abolished) section, and it began to operate direct trains on the Amishima Station in Osaka (a terminal station that existed near current Kyobashi Station (Osaka Prefecture) from 1898 until 1913)-Shijonawate Station-Nagoya Station section via the line of Naniwa Railway which the company acquired during the previous year.

Osaka Railway Company (the first) began operating the Nara-Minatomachi (current JR Namba) section in 1892, and Nara Railway Company began operating the Kizu-Nara section in 1896. After it began operating the Daibutsu-Nara section, Kansai Railway Company acquired Osaka Railway Company in 1900 and changed the route of the main line that connected Nagoya and Osaka to the one that runs via Daibutsu. Thereafter, the company acquired Nara Railway Company, abolished the Kamo-Daibutsu-Nara section and changed the route of main line to the one that runs via Kizu in 1907. Thus, the current route was completed.

Kansai Railway fiercely competed with the government-managed railway (the Tokaido Main Line) in the area between Nagoya and Osaka, but was nationalized in 1907.

With private railway companies, such as the Osaka Electric Tramway (currently Kinki Nippon Railway Company), expanding their networks from the Taisho era, the line gradually lost passengers to them. Although the line's modernization was delayed, the Nara-Minatomachi section and the Nagoya-Kameyama section were electrified in 1973 and 1982 respectively. After the launch of JR, the Kamo-JR Namba section was incorporated into the Urban Network and its transport capacity was improved. JR Central also tried to regain lost ground by beginning to operate Rapid "Mie."

May 14, 1889

The Minatomachi-Kashihara section of the Osaka Railway (the first) (ten miles and ten chains (unit) ≒16.29 km) was opened to traffic. Minatomachi Station (current JR Namba Station), Tennoji Station, Hirano Station, Yao Station and Kashihara Station were established.

September 11, 1890

The Kashiwara-Kamese Temporary Station section (3M58C ≒ 5.99 km) was opened to traffic by extending the line. Kamese Temporary Station was established.

December 27

The Nara - Oji section (9M44C ≒ 15.37 km) was opened to traffic. Nara Station, Koriyama Station, Horyu-ji Station and Oji Station were established.

February 8, 1891

The Oji-Inabayama Temporary Station section (1M30C ≒ 2.21 km) was opened to traffic by extending the line. Inabayama Temporary Station was established. Passengers had to walk or use jinrikisha (a taxi-like vehicle pulled by a man) between Inabayama Temporary Station and Kamese Temporary Station.

February 2, 1892

The Kamese Temporary Station-Inabayama Temporary Station section (64C ≒1.29 km) was opened to traffic by extending the line, and as a result, the Minatomachi-Nara section was fully opened to traffic. Inabayama and Kamese Temporary Stations were abolished.

January 29, 1894

The distance of the entire line was shortend by 3C (≒0.06 km).

February 28, 1899

The distance of the entire line was shortend by 7C (≒0.14 km).

March 1

Imamiya Station was established.

June 6, 1900

Osaka Railway Company assigned its line to the Kansai Railway Company.

April 18, 1896

The Kizu-Nara section of Nara Railway (4M32C ≒ 7.08 km) opened to traffic by extending the line, and as a result, the Kyoto-Nara section was fully opened to traffic.

November 12, 1902

The unit of business distance was simplified from miles/chains to miles only (4M32C => 4.4 M).

February 7, 1905

Nara Rrailway Company assigned its line to Kansai Railway Company.

February 19, 1890

Kansai Railway's Tsuge Station was established (when the Mikumo-Tsuge section was opened to traffic).

December 25

The Tsuge-Yokkaichi section (26M50C ≒ 42.85 km) was opened to traffic by extending the line. Seki Station, Kameyama Station, Kawarada Station and Yokkaichi Station were established. The line connected to the sea line of Nippon Yusen Kabushiki Kaisha at the Yokkaichi Station.

February 6, 1892

Takamiya Station (current Kasado Station) was established.

July 5, 1894

The Yokkaichi - Kuwana Temporary Station section (7M30C ≒ 11.87 km) was opened to traffic by extending the line. Tomida Station and Kuwana Temporary Station was established.

May 24, 1895

The Nagoya-Maegasu section (10M21C ≒ 16.52 km) and the Kuwana Temporary Station-Kuwana section (64C ≒ 1.29km) were opened to traffic. Kanie Station, Maegasu Station (current Yatomi Station) and Kuwana Station were established. Kuwana Temporary Station was abolished.

November 7

The Yatomi - Kuwana section (4M53C ≒ 7.50 km) was opened to traffic by extending the line, and as a result, the Nagoya-Kusatsu section was fully opened to traffic. Maegasu Station was renamed Yatomi Station.

July 3, 1896

Aichi Station was established between Nagoya and Kanie.

September 21

Kata Station was established

January 15, 1897

The Tsuge-Ueno section (9M8C ≒ 14.65 km) was opened to traffic as a branch line. Sanagu Station and Ueno Station (current Iga-Ueno Station) were established.

November 11

The Ueno-Kamo section (16M26C ≒ 26.27 km) of a branch line was opened to traffic by extending the line. Shimagahara Station, Ogawara Station, Kasagi Station and Kamo Station were established.

April 19, 1898

The Kamo-Daibutsu section (5M35C ≒ 8,75 km) of a branch line was opened to traffic. Daibutsu Station was established. The Nagoya-Kamo section became the main line and the Tsuge-Kusatsu section became a branch line.

November 18

The Kamo-Shinkizu section was opened to traffic by extending the line, and was connected to the line running toward the Amishima Station (it later became the Katamachi Line). The Nagoya-Amishima section was fully opened to traffic and direct trains began to run.

May 21, 1899

The Daibutsu-Nara section (57C ≒ 1.15 km) of branch line was opened to traffic by extending the line, and as a result, the Nagoya-Nara section was fully opened to traffic.

October 23

The Kamo-Nara section was extended by 11C (≒ 0.22 km).

November 11

Nagashima Station was established.

June 6, 1900

Osaka Railway Company assigned its line to Kansai Railway Company. The Nagoya-Daibutsu-Minatomachi section became the main line and the Kamo-Amishima section became a branch line.

September 1

The main line route was changed to one that ran from Nagoya, Daibutsu to Minatomachi.

January 25, 1901

The distance of the entire line was shortened by 4C (≒ 0.08 km).

October 12, 1902

The unit of business distance was simplified from miles/chains to miles only (the Nagoya-Minatomachi section 106M67C => 106.8M).

January 29, 1903

The Tenoji-Minatomachi section became a double-tarck section.

February 1

Takamiya Station was renamed Kasado Station.

March 1

The Tennoji - Hakurankai section was opened to traffic as a branch line. Hakurankai Station was established. Hakurankai Fuzoku Platform was established between Tenoji and Imamiya. It was established in connection with the Fifth Hakurankai (Expo).

November 1

The Tenoji-Hakurankai section branch line was abolished. Hakurankai Station and Hakurankai Fuzoku Platform were abolished.

February 7, 1905

Nara Railway Company assigned its line to Kansai Railway Company.

July 1, 1907

Tomidahama Temporary Station was established (summer season only).

August 21

The Kamo-Kizu section was opened to traffic (mileage was not set). Operations on the Kamo-Daibutsu-Nara section and the Kamo-Shinkizu section were suspended. Daibutsu Station was abolished.

October 1, 1907

Kansai Railway company was nationalized.

November 1

Mileage was set for the Kamo-Kizu section (3.7M ≒ 5.95 km). The Kamo-Daibutsu-Nara section (6.1M ≒ 9.82 km) and the Kamo-Shinkizu section were formally abolished.

March 30, 1908

The Kashiwara-Tenoji section became a double-track section.

October 7, 2010

Ando Signal Station was established between Koriyama and Horyuji.

November 5

Ando Signal Station was abolished.

April 1, 1909

Shiki Station, Kami Station and Kudara Station (the first) were established.

June 1

Aichi Station was integrated into Nagoya Station.

October 12

The name of the railway line was established, and the Nogoya-Nara-Minatomachi section was named the Kansai Main Line.

December 1, 1910

Kyuhoji Station was established.

November 5, 1911

Aodani Signal Station was established between Oji and Kashiwara.

March 20, 1914

The Kizu-Nara section became a double-track section.

February 13, 1915

Saki Temporary Signal Station was established between Kizu and Nara.

June 7

Saki Temporary Signal Station was abolished.

September 11, 1916

Ueno Station was renamed Iga-Ueno Station.

July 15, 1918

Hatta Signal Station was established between Nagoya and Kanie.

August 25, 1920

Yamato-Koizumi Station was established.

December 21

The Yokkaichi-Yokkaichi-ko section(1.1M≒1.77km) of a freight branch line was opened to traffic. (Freight) Yokkaichi Station was established.

July 15, 1921

Shindo Station was established.

April 1, 1922

Shingosho (signal station) was changed to shingojo (signal station).

December 15, 1923

The Aoya Signal Station-Kashihara section became a double-track section.

March 29, 1924

The Oji-Aoya Signal Station section became a double-track section.

August 10

Miato Temporary Signal Station (the first) was established between Kizu and Nara (date of abolition is unknown).

June 16, 1925

The Koriyama-Yamato-Koizumi section became a double-track section.

August 26

The Nara-Koriyama section became a double-track section.

January 10, 1926

Miato Temporary Signal Station (the second) was established (date of abolition is unknown).

April 30

The Yamato-Koizumi-Horyuji section became a double-track section.

July 22

The Horyuji - Oji section became a double-track section.

April 19, 1927

Aoya Signal Station was upgraded to Kawachi-Katakami Station.

May 1

Asake Signal Station was established betwee Kuwana and Asahi.

June 1

Zenta Signal Station was established between Kanie and Yatomi.

February 1, 1928

Hatta Signal Station was upgraded to Hatta Station.

March 1

Tomidahama Temporary Station was upgraded to Tomidahama Station.

April 1

Nakazaike Signal Station was established between Kada and Tsuge.

July 1

Hinaga Signal Station was established between Yokkaichi and Kawarada, and Kida Signal Station was established between Kawarada and Kasado.

December 1

The Imamiya-Naniwa Station-Osakako Station (Japan National Railway) section (5.2M ≒ 8.37 km) of freight branch line was opened to traffic (the line was later incorporated into the Osaka Loop Line and became its freight branch line).

February 1, 1929

Zenta Signal Station was upgraded to Eiwa Station.

May 20

Idagawa Station was established.

April 1, 1930

The unit of business distance was changed from miles to meters (Nagoya - Minatomachi 108.8M =>175.1km, Yokkaichi - Yokkaichiko 1.1M => 1.7km, Imamiya - Osakako 5.2M => 8.2km)

July 7, 1931

Umaokoshi Temporary Station was established between Tomidahama and Yokkaichi.

July 8

Shogakuji Signal Station (the first) was established between Kami and Hirano.

January 27, 1932

Kamenose Signal Station was established between Oji and Kawachi-Katakami.

February 1

Service was interrupted on the Oji-Kawachi-Katakami section because Kamenose Tunnel was deformed by a landslide.

February 20

Kamenose-higashiguchi Temporary Station (Kamenose Signal Station was renamed) was established at the east entrance of Kamenose Tunnel and Kamenose-nishiguchi Temporary Station was established at the west entrance. Service was resumed betwee Oji and Kamenose-higashiguchi/Kamenose-nishiguchi, and passengers were required to walk between two temporary stations.

June 1

Kashiwara Temporary Paltform was established at a place adjacent to the Ando Station of Osaka Electric Tramway' Sakurai Line (current Kintetsu Osaka Line), which was located 900m south of the Kashiwara Station, and substitute transport for the interrupted section began by using this line and the Wakayama Line (two lines connected at the Shimoda Station, current Kintetsu Shimoda Station, and the Kasiba Station).

August 1

Distance of the Yokkaichi-Yokkaichiko section was revised (+0.8km).

December 31

The operation on the Oji-Kawachi-Katakami section was resumed using a single track that was newly constructed on the opposite side of Yamato-gawa River. Fujii Signal Station was established on the new track.

January 1, 1933

Kamenose-higashiguchi Temporary Station, Kamenose-nishiguchi Temporary Station and Kashiwara Temporary Paltform were abolished.

November 20

The Oji-Fuii Signal Station section became a double-track section.

December 30, 1935

The Fujii Signal Station- Kawachi-Katakami section became a double-track section. Fujii Signal Station was abolished.

October 1, 1938

Ryuge Train Yard was established between Yao and Kyuhoji.

Octobery 15, 1939

Shogakuji Signal Station (the first) was abolished.

July 25, 1941

Shogakuji Signal Station (the second) was established between Kami and Hirano.

June 1, 1944

The Yokkaichi-Shiohama section (3.3km) of the freight branch line was opened to traffic. (Freight) Shiohama station was established.

August

The Nara-Oji section became a single-track section due to materials contribution.

November 25, 1945

Ibigawa Temporary Signal Station was established between Nagashima and Kuwana.

May 1, 1946

Ibigawa Temporary Signal Station was abolished.

March 15, 1947

Saho Signal Station (the first) was established between Kizu and Nara.

October

Shiki Station's operation was suspended.

August 30, 1948

Umaokoshi Temporary Station was abolished.

March 1, 1949

Kida Signal Station was upgraded to Suzuka Station (currently Kawano Station).

October 1, 1950

Night Eexpress started to run on the Tokyo-Minatomachi/Toba section. During the next year, it was named "Tokaido-honsen Yutoressha Enkaku" (Tokaido Main Line superior train history).

December 28, 1951

Tsukigaseguchi Station was established.

September 1, 1952

The Yao-Ryuge Train Yard-Sugimotocho section of freight branch lone (11.3km) opened to traffic.

November 11, 1953

Express "Yamato" bound for Toba was separated as "Tokaido-honsen Yutoressha Enkaku."

June 1, 1954

Umaokoshi Station, at which only Sangi Railway's direct trains bound for Yokkaichi Station stop, was established between Tomidahama and Yokkaichi.

March 15, 1956

The Naniwa-Osakahigashiko section of the freight branch line was opened to traffic.

September 27

On the Seki-Kata section, a down train ran over some earth and sand caused by a landslide and passenger cars fell into a river. Eight persons were killed (five passengers, three staffers) and three were injured.

November 17

The route of Kamo-Kizu section was changed from passing through Kaseyama Tunnel to passing through Fudozan Tunnel.

November 20

Saho Signal Station (the first) was abolished.

November 1, 1958

The semi-express that ran on the Nagoya-Minatomachi section was named "Kasuga (train)."

July 15, 1959

Express "Kii (train)" started to run between Tokyo and Shingu Station. It ran with "Ise" being connected in the Kansai Main Line section.

February 21, 1961

The Horyuji-Oji section became a double-track section again.

March 6

The Koriyama-Horyuji section became a double-track section again.

March 21

The Nara-Koriyama section became a double-track section again.

April 25

The Imamiya-Naniwa-Osakako section (8.2km) and the Naniwa-Osakahigashiko section (3.0km) of the freight branch line were incorporated into the Osaka Loop Line.

October 11

Shiki Station was moved to the Yao side by 0.2km and its operation was resumed.

December 10

Shogakuji Signal Station (the second) was abolished.

April 1, 1963

Kami Station was moved to the Hirano side by 0.3km.

September 10

Kudara Station (the first), whose operation had been suspended since around 1945, was abolished.

October 1

The Hirano-Kudara (the second) section of freight branch line (1.4km) was opened to traffic. (Freight) Kudara Station (the second) was established. Hinaga Signal station was upgraded to Minami-yokkaichi Station.

October 1, 1965

Umaokoshi Station was abolished.

November 24

The Kudara-Kudara-ichiba section of freight branch line (2.1km) was opened to traffic. (Freight) Kudara-ichiba Station was established.

March 1, 1965

Passengers service started on the Yao-Sugimotocho section of the Hanwa Freight Line. Limited Express "Kasuga" using diesel cars started to run between Nagoya-Wakayama via the Hanwa Feight Line,.

March 5, 1966

Semi-express "Kasuga" was upgraded to Express.

October 1, 1967

Limited Express "Asuka" was abolished.

March 25, 1968

The Tennoji-Shinimamiya section became a quadruple-track section. Train operation of the line was separated from the Osaka Loop Line.

October 1

Express "Kii (train)" started to run by integrating Express "Yamato,""Ise," and "Nachi."

March 15, 1972

Express began to stop at Shinimamiya Station. Express "Kii" bound for Oji/Toba was abolished.

September 27

The Asake Signal Station-Tomida section became a double track section.

July 10, 1973

Suzuka Station was renamed Kawano Station.

September 20

The Nara-Minatomachi section was electrified.

October 1

The Express "Kasuga" route was shortened from Nagoya to Nara. Rapid service directly running into the Osaka Loop Line (the predecessor of Yamatoji Rapid) started.

Janauary 31, 1977

The Nagashima-Kuwana section became a double-track section.

August 1, 1979

The Nagoya-Hatta section was electrified (business operation by electric cars started on May 17, 1982).

March 3, 1980

Sango Station was established.

March 24

The Yatomi-Nagashima section became a double-track section.

May 17, 1982

The Hatta-Kameyama section was electrified.

March 8, 1983

CTC was introduced on the Kameyama-Kizu section.

August 8

Asahi Station was established. Asake Signal Station was moved north by 2.1km.

February 1, 1984

The Kudara-Kudaraichiba section of freight line (2.1km) was abolished.

August 31

Saho Signal Station (the second) was established between Kizu and Nara.

October 1

The (Kyoto-) Kizu-Nara section was electrified.

March 14, 1985

The Yokkaichi-Yokkaichiko section of freight line (2.5km) was abolished. Freight service on the Shinimamiya-Minatomachi section was abolished.

August 29

Takaida Station was established.

December 1

Narayama Station was established.

November 1, 1986

Ryuge Train Yard was downgraded to Ryuge Signal Station.

April 1, 1987

As the result of the division and privatization of JNR, JR Central became the operator of the Nagoya-Kameyama section (59.9km), and JR West became the operator of the Kameyama-Minatomachi section (115.2km) as well as the Yao-Ryuge Signal Station-Sugimotocho section (11.3km). Japan Freight Railway Company became a first class railway operator of the Yokkaichi-Shiohama section (3.3km) and the Hirano-Kudara section (1.4km), and it also became a second class railway operator of the Nagoya-Kameyama section (59.9km), the Kizu-Shinimamiya section (45.5km) and the Ryuge Signal Station-Sugimotocho section (10.5km). Freight service on the Kameyama-Kizu section was abolished.

March 13, 1988

The Kamo-Kizu section was electrified. The nickname of the Yamatoji Line began to be in use for the Kamo-Minatomachi section. The nickname "Rapid Yamatoji" began to be in use for Rapid running on the Kamo-Osaka section. "Yamatoji Liner" started to run on the Kamo/Kizu-Minatomachi/Osaka section.

April 10, 1989

Replacement of cars for "Rapid Yamatoji" with JR West Surburban Trains Series 221 started (replacement was completed in July).

November 11

Tobushijomae Station was established.

December 28

Minatomachi Station was relocated and the line's distance was revised accordingly (-0.2km).

March 10, 1990

Rapid "Mie" started to run.

June 1

One-man operation began on the Kameyama-Kamo section.

March 14, 1992

Cars of the Diesel train Series Kiha 82 used for Limited Express "Nanki" were replaced with Series Kiha 85 (wide-view). As a result, Diesel Cars Series Kiha 82 disappeared from all regular Limited Express trains throughout the nation.

February 10, 1993

ATS-P (transponder method) came into use on the Oji-Minatomachi section.

July 24

The Tomidahama-Yokkaichi section became a double-track section.

August 1

Haruta and Shiratori Signal Stations were established on the Hatta-Kanie section and the Eiwa-Yatomi section respectively. Cars on Diesel trains Series Kiha 58/65 used for Rapid "Mie" were replaced with Series Kiha 75.

Septembr 4, 1994

Minatomachi Station was renamed JR Namba.

March 22, 1996

Imamiya Station was elevated and JR Namba Station became an underground station.

July 28, 1997

Ryuge Signal Station was abolished and integrated into Yao station.

September 28, 1998

Fushiya Signal Station was established between Hatta and Haruta Signal Stations.

January 14, 2001

CTC was introduced on the Nagoya-Kameyama section.

March 3

Haruta Signal Station was upgraded to Haruta Station. One-man operation began on the Nagoya-Kameyama section.

April 7, 2002

Hatta Station was elevated and relocated toward the Nagoya side by 0.5km.

April 1, 2003

Japan Freight Railway Company's second class railway business (40.6km of the Kizu-Hirano section, 10.5km of the former Ryuge Signal Station-Sugimotocho section) was abolished.

June 30, 2004

The operation of Hanwa Freight Line (Yao-Sugimotocho) was suspended.

January 30, 2005

Fushiya Signal Station was abolished.

March 18, 2006

Express "Kasuga" was abolished
Changing cars at Nakazaike Signal Station was ended.

April 1

Japan Freight Railway Company's second class railway business (4.9km of the Hirano-Shinimamiya section) was abolished.

December 16

ATS-P (base method) came into use on the Kamo-Oji section.

June 29, 2008

Nara Station's platform for the Kansai Main Line was elevated.

March 31, 2009

The Hanwa freight Line (11.3km of the Yao-Sugimotocho section) was abolished.

Nagoya - Kameyama section

As the line competes with Kintetsu Nagoya Line between Nagoya and Yokkaichi, JR Central tried to regain lost ground by starting to operate Rapid "Mie," in addition to a special discount fare applied to this section since the era of Japan National Railway. In addition, the company converted a part of the line into double-track section and already purchased the land necessary for converting the rest of the Nagoya - Kawarada section into double-track section. Several signal stations have been established using the above-mentioned land in the case where the distance between the stations is long. During the daytime, the company began to operate Rapid service, which stops at the same stations with Rapid Mie, between Nagoya and Yokkaichi after the revision of timetable made in March 2009. As a result, Rapid service is operated twice per hour on this section.

After trains depart from the Nagoya Station, the line diverges from the Tokaido Main Line etc. and turns toward the right. There is the Nagoya Train Terminal on the right, and "Aichi Station," where Kansai Railway was established, used to be located there. On the line's left, there used to be Sasajima Station, and the freight line running to Nagoya Freight Terminal Station, the successor of Sasajima Station, diverges from the line just before Hatta. Nagoya Rinkai Kosoku Railway Company Ltd. (the Nishinagoyako Line of Nagoya Rinkai Kosoku Railway) is also using this freight line. Trains run on an elevated track and arrive at the Hatta Station. The Kintetsu Hatta Station of Kintetsu Nagoya Line and the Hatta Station of Nagoya Municipal Subway Higashiyama Line are located nearby. Trains run on the bank and pass over the Shonai-gawa River. Thereafter, trains pass over the Shinkawa River (Nagoya City, Aichi Prefecture), National Road 302 and arrive at the Haruta Station. Trains run beside the city housing zone, pass over Fukuda-gawa River, enter Kanie-cho, and arrive at Kanie Station. Trains pass over the Nikko-gawa River, enter Aisai City, and arrive at the Eiwa Station. Trains run through residential areas and paddy fields, and enter Yatomi City. The line connects to the Meitetsu Bisai Line at Yatomi Station, but many houses are located around the station. Kintetsu Yatomi Station, a modern-looking station building, is located just the south of the station. Trains pass over the Kiso-gawa River and enter from Aichi Prefecture to Mie Prefecture. After passing Nagashima Station, located on a river sandbar, Kintetsu Nagashima Station of Kintetsu Railway is located in the vicinity, trains run side by side along Kintetsu through the area where the Nagara-gawa and the Ibi-gawa Rivers flow and cross under the Kintetsu Line just before arriving at Kuwana Station.

At Kuwana, the line connects to Yoro Railway and Sangi Railway's Hokusei Line in addition to the Kintetsu Nagoya Line. This station is the central station for Kuwana City, and other than the station building, bus terminals, hotels, and supermarkets are located in the open space in front of the station. Many houses are located in front of its west entrance.

Trains cross under the Sangi Hokusei Line, run side by side along the Kintetsu Nagoya Line, enter Asahi-cho (Mie Prefecture), part from the Kintetsu Line just before the works of Toshiba and arrive at Asahi Station. Trains enter Yokkaichi City just before crossing under the Isewangan Expressway, cross under the Sangi Line of Sangi Railway and the Kintetsu Line and arrive at Tomida Station (Mie Prefecture). Tomida Station is a vast freight terminal station where many freight cars are being deposited, and smoke emitted from Yokkaichi Industrial Complex is seen in the sky in the background. This station is the base for Sangi Railway and its head office is located near the east entrance. However, the atmosphere of the surrounding area is hardly that of an area near a station, and a large-scale supermarket with a vast parking space is located across National Route one. A residential area is located before the west entrance. After passing this station, trains run along the Yokkaichi Industrial Complex. Factories of various sizes and relevant offices are located and there are green spaces here and there. Trains run side by side along National Route one and the National route twenty-three and arrive at Tomidahama Station. Then, the trains arrive at Yokkaichi Station.

Though the station was named after the City, the central station of Yokkaichi City is actually Kintetsu Yokkaichi Station of the Kintetsu Line. The station building is long horizontally, and a broad street runs straight from the station square, where bus stops are located, toward Kintetsu Yokkaichi Station. The municipal office and court buildings are located along the above street. Freight trains are being deposited at this station and a freight line diverges from the line. White smoke emitted from chimneys, which are patchily painted in red, can be seen.

After passing Minami-yokkaichi station, the next stop, and the industrial area, trains arrive at Kawarada Station. The line connects to the Ise Line of Ise Railway at this station, and trains arrive at this station running between two single-tracks, one for up trains and the other for down trains. As the platform of Ise Railway is located on a hill, passengers transferring to it use the platform of the Kansai Main Line. Superior trains coming from Nagoya, such as Limited Express "Nanki (train)" and Rapid "Mie (train)," directly run onto Ise Railway from this station and towards Tsu.

Though the track is a double-track in spots up to Yakkaichi, it becomes a single-track from there. Trains run through a rural zone where houses are sparsely located, and then run around the foot of a low hill situated at the sourthern edge of the Suzuka mountain range. When trains enter Suzuka City, water surface is visible as the Suzuka-gawa River flows just south of the line. After passing Kawano Station, trains arrive at Kasado Station. Houses are densely located on a slope located north of the station and a concrete works is located south of the station. Trains enter Kameyama City, and the water surface is shielded by a bank after passing the Idagawa Station close to where a housing complex is located. Trains run through paddy fields and arrive at Kameyama Station after merging with the Kisei Main Line coming from the left side. Though some multi-tenant buildings are located in front of the Station, the central district of the city is obscured. The station is located on a hill, the Suzuka-gawa River flows south of the station, high land is located north of the station and the turret of the former Kameyama-jo Castle is visible from the station.

Kameyama Station is under the jurisdiction of JR Central, and it is a station located on the border with the section managed by JR West. The station has three platforms and five tracks, and the line connects with the Kisei Main Line at this station.

Kameyama - Kamo section

This is an unelectrified section. At present, only single or two-car trains of the Kiha 120 type run on this section. However, because trains made up of many cars used to run during the JNR era, the station platforms and facilities for waiting other trains are quite long.

After Kameyama, trains run side by side along National Route one and arrive at the Seki Station (Mie Prefecture). Then, trains run side by side along National Route twenty-five and arrive at the Kabuto Station (Mie Prefecture). A steep section called Kabuto-goe is located on the Kabuto - Tsuge section, and the Nakazaike Signal Station, which is located at twenty-five steep on this section, is a signal station for a switchback.

Trains enter Iga City, and the Kusatsu line diverge at the Tsuge Station. As Kansai Railway constructed the track from Kusatsu toward Tsuge, trains on the Kusatsu line run straight while trains on the Kansai Main Line diverge toward the left when coming from the Kameyama side. Locomotives for Kabuto-goe once turned back at Tsuge, and there were necessary facilities, such as a turnplate and a water tower located at this station. Such facilities had already been withdrawn.

After Tsuge, trains run through Iga Basin side by side along National Route twenty-five and arrive at Shindo Station. The station once had two platforms and three tracks, but it has one platform and two tracks at present. Trains run straight toward the west for a while, pass Sanagu Station which has two platforms and two tracks and arrive at Iga-Ueno Station. The Iga-Ueno Station has two platforms and three tracks, and the trains on the Iga Line of Iga Railway, converted from the Kintetsu Iga Line, arrive at and depart from this down-train platform. Trains of Iga Railway run through the urban district of Iga City up to the Iga- Kanbe Station of the Kintetsu Osaka Line. The central district of Iga City, famous for ninja (Japanese secret agent in feudal times), is located near the Ueno-shi Station of the Iga Railway.

Trains run on flatland for a while, and after passing Shimagahara Station which has two platforms and two tracks, they run side by side along National Route 163 and enter a mountainous area. While passengers can enjoy the beautiful valley of Kizu-gawa River (Kyoto Prefecture) from the train windows, this area is a bottleneck for the maintenance of safety since the line is often interrupted by heavy rain. Trains enter Kyoto Prefecture and arrive at Tsukigase Station that has two platforms and two tracks. After passing Ogawara Station(Kyoto Prefecture) located near the Minami-Yamashiro village office, trains arrive at the Kasagi Station which is famous for cherry-blossoms and a beautiful valley. The next station, Kamo Station(Kyoto Prefecture), is located on the overpass and has two platforms and three tracks, and the line connects with the Yamatoji Rapid train bound for Tenoji/Osaka at this station. As the center track lies between two platforms, diesel trains coming from Kameyama use this center track in principle so that passengers can transfer to electric cars going to Osaka on the same platform, and vice versa.

Kamo - JR Namba section

The line is electrified from Kamo to the west, and trains run through Fudozan Tunnel and arrive at the Kizu Station (Kyoto Prefecture). Though Kansai Railway earlier operated the line between Kamo and Nara via Daibutsu, this line was later abolished when a shortcut line connecting Kamo and Kizu was completed. The site of the above line's track exists at present, and the site of the old track, replaced due to an earthquake, is located near Fudozan Tunnel.

Kizu Station is a key junction of traffic since the Nara Line and the Katamachi Line, running towards Nara, Kyoto, and Kyobashi, diverge at this station. However, the number of passengers is not so much. After Kizu, trains run with a view to Kizu Interchange of Keinawa Expressway and National Route twenty-four on the right hand side. After entering Nara Prefecture, trains arrive at Narayama Station followed by Saho Signal Station at which a side track running to Nara Train Depo diverges. Both newly developed residential districts and ancient burial mounds are seen in this area, the northern part of Nara City. After running through such scenery, the trains arrive at Nara Station where the Sakurai Line diverges.

Construction work to elevate a track near the station is underway. The removal of the old building of Nara Station, which is famous for temple-style architecture, was once studied, but it was finally decided to preserve it in the vicinity of the station. The station's utilization status is not so good due to the fact that Kintetsu Nara Station of Kintetsu Railway is in a superior position in terms of convenience for Nara sightseeing and access to public offices, and the line is inferior to the Kintetsu line in terms of fare, required time and frequency of operation of the trains going to Kyoto and Osaka. Also, no superior trains like the Limited Express arrive at or depart from the station in spite of the fact that it is a terminal station of the JR line located in the prefectural capital.

Trains run near Horyu-ji Temple on the Nara - Oji section. After departing Nara, trains run through the vast scenery of the Nara Basin and arrive at Koriyama Station (Nara Prefecture) which has two platforms and two tracks. Kintetsu Koriyama Station is more convenient for visiting Yamato-Koriyama Municipal Office and the site of Koriyama-jo Castle. Trains run seeing residential districts, paddies/fields and ponds for breeding gold fish, cross under the Kintetsu Kashihara Line and arrive at Yamato-Koizumu Station. Horyuji Station, the next station, is the central station of Ikaruga-cho, and is located on the overpass and has two platforms and two tracks. Horyu-ji Temple, after which the station was named, is located rather far from the station. After Horyuji Station, the train run through paddies/fields located in the southern part of Nara Basin. After passing over Yamato-gawa River and crossing under the Kintetsu Tawaramoto Line, the Wakayama Line joins from the left. Trains cross under National Route twenty-five and arrive at Oji Station. This station is a key junction of traffic in the western part of Nara Prefecture as the Wakayama Line, the Kintetsu Ikoma Line and the Kintetsu Tawaramoto Line concentrate here.

Trains run along the Yamato-gawa River from Oji to Kashiwara. In this section, there is a dangerous spot where landslides often occur and the line's route has been repeatedly changed. Trains run through the Osaka plains from Kashiwara. The surrounding area has been urbanized completely and a lot of houses and apartments are seen from car windows.

After departing from Oji Station, trains pass over the Yamato-gawa River and arrive at Sango Station (Nara Prefecture). Thereafter, trains run side by side along National Route twenty-five, enter Osaka Prefecture and arrive at Kawachi-Katakami Station which has two platforms and two tracks. After departing Kawachi-Katakami Station, trains make a curve to the right and then left, pass over the Yamato-gawa River and arrive at Takaida Station (Kashiwara City, Osaka Prefecture). After departing Takaida Station, trains run where mountains are looming on the right side and cross under the Kintetsu Osaka Line. National Route twenty-five and the Yamato-gawa River run on the left side. Trains run on this narrow path for a while and arrive at Kashiwara station after passing where the Kintetsu Line diverges to the right. This station has two platforms and four tracks, and the trains of Kintetsu Domyoji Line depart from and arrive at this station. After departing Kashiwara Station, trains enter Yao City and arrive at Shiki Station soon after crossing under National Route 170 (Osaka Outer Loop Line). Thereafter, trains run straight and arrive at Yao Station which has a simple structure of two platforms and two tracks. Although it is the central station of Yao City, it is located a little far from the urban district. Kintetsu Yao Station of the Kintetsu Railway is located about one kilometer north of the station, and its surrounding area is prosperous since bank branches, a shopping arcade, and a large-scale commercial complex are located there. After departing Yao Station, trains run seeing the vast site of the former Ryuge Train Yard on the left and arrive at the Kyuhoji Station where the line connects with the Osaka-higashi Line, a passenger line that was converted from the Joto Freight Line.

The Ryuge Track Yard used to be between the tracks of up-train and down-train, and the platforms of up-train and down-train were located separately. At present, there aren't any traces of the yard thanks to the land readjustment project. This station is located on the overpass and has two platforms and four tracks, and Local usually connects with Rapid trains at this station. Trains enter Hirano Ward, Osaka Prefecture at the point where the Kinki Jidosha Expressway and Osaka-chuo-kanjo-sen Belt Line crosses under the line. The Osaka-higashi Line diverges to the right and the Hanwa Freight Line used to diverge to the left just before Kami Station. After the freight service was abolished, only special trains and sabitori-ressha (trains operated for removing the rust from the track) using the 117 Series made just one round trip a day on the Hanwa Freight Line. However, the above operation was suspended in July 2004 and the line was formally abolished in March 2009.

After departing from Kami Station, the Joto Freight Line's single track merges from the right side. Freight trains run on the same track from here to Kudara Station of the Japan Freight Railway Company (JR Freight). As the track of the Joto Freight line is only connected to the up-train track (toward Nagoya) of Kansai Main Line, both up and down freight trains run on the up-train track of Kansai Main Line. Trains pass over the Hirano-gawa River and arrive at Hirano Station (JR West). Hirano Station has two platforms and four tracks, and trains can wait for other trains' passing. However, there is no platform for the track on which down-trains pass (toward Namba) since tracks are set up in a irregular form. After departing Hirano Station, trains cross over National Route 479 (Inner Loop Line) and run on the elevated track with a view of Kudara Station. Trains cross over the Imazato-suji Street and arrive at Tobushijomae Station. Trains run with a view of the elevated track of the Kintetsu Minami-Osaka Line, cross under the elevated track of the Hanwa Line and arrive at Tennoji Station immediately after passing the point at which the Osaka Loop Line merges.

At Tennoji Station, one of the nation's biggest terminals, the line connects with the Osaka Loop Line and the Hanwa line as well as the Midosuji Line and Tanimachi Line of Osaka Municipal Subway, and the stations of the Kintetsu Minami-Osaka Line and the Uemachi Line of Hankai Electric Tramway are also located on the opposite side of Abiko-suji Street.

Trains run side by side along the Osaka Loop Line from Tennoji to Imamiya. The Imamiya-JR Namba section is the underground section. After departing Tennoji Station, trains cross under the Hanshin Expressway, cross over the Hankai Line of the Hankai Electric Tramway as well as Sakai-suji Street and arrive at Shinimamiya Station. The line connects with the Nankai Main Line and the line of the Hankai Electric Tramway at this station, and passengers can transfer to the Nankai Line by going up the stairway located on the JR Namba side, passing through a ticket gate and using Nankai's ticket gate which is located nearby. The tracks of both the Kansai Main Line and the Osaka Loop Line are elevated at Imamiya Station, the next station, and passengers can transfer also at this station thanks to the establishment of the Imamiya Station on the Osaka Loop Line. Passengers from the down line of the Kansai Main Line and those from the outer loop of the Osaka Loop Line can mutually transfer on the same platform. The platform of the inner loop of the Osaka Loop Line is located over the down-train platform. After departing Imamiya Station, trains run underground while making a curve toward the right and arrive at JR Namba Station, the terminal station.

JR Namba Station was called "Minatomachi" in the past, but it was renamed in 1994 and became an underground station in 1996. This station has two platforms and four tracks. At this station, the line connects with the Sennichimae Line of the Osaka Municipal Subway, the Yotsubashi Line of the Osaka Municipal Subway, Kinki-Nippon Railway, Hanshin Electric Railway and the Nankai Electric Railway. However, all the above lines are located a little far from this station and transfer is not so convenient even in the case of the Yotsubashi Line of the Osaka Municipal Subway, which is the nearest one.
Osaka City Air Terminal, a terminal of limousines bound for Osaka International Airport and Kansai International Airport as well as express buses bound for various places, is located above the station,
As the surrounding area has been redeveloped rapidly, many skyscraper condos are standing side by side near the station.

Hanwa Freight Line

In the past, there was a branch line running between Yao Sugimotocho Stations, that connected the Kansai Main Line with the Hanwa Line and was commonly called the "Hanwa Freight Line" or "Hanwa Connecting Line," and JR West set passenger business kilometers of 11.3km (trains ran on the main line between Yao and Kyuhoji and this line actually diverged at the point between Kyuhoji and Kami). Using this connecting line, special trains and trains exclusive for groups passengers were operated. Also, Limited Express "Kasuga" operated between Nagoya and Higashi-Wakayama (current Wakayama) as a regular train during the period from 1965 to 1967, the era of JNR. However, this line was commonly called by the above-mentioned name because its original purpose was freight service. There were plans to extend the line beyond Sugimotocho, to construct a track yard (railway) at Kitajima and to construct a freight & passenger line from Suminoe to Osakako and Ohama in Sakai City (including a plan to convert the Hanwa Freight line into a freight & passenger line), but none of them materialized because of financial difficulties of JNR.

After the launch of JR, the line was used almost exclusively for Ko-shu railway transport of cars delivered to Nankai Railway Company. As the line was used at a low frequency due to the nature of Ko-shu railway transport, sabitori-ressha operated between Oji and the Otori Stations. After the delivery route for automobiles was changed, the license granted to JR Freight was cancelled as of April 1, 2003. Although the line was maintained by JR West thereafter, its operations were suspended and the joint with the Kansai Main Line was removed at the end of June 2004 on the grounds that the line could become an obstacle for repair work at the Yamato-gawa River by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism as well as for construction work on the Osaka-higashi Line. Finally, JR West applied for the cancellation of the first class railway operator's license on November 17, 2008 on the grounds that it no longer needed the line since a new line connecting the Hanwa and Yamatoji Lines was completed inside Tenoji Station's premises. Thereafter, the line was formally abolished as of March 31, 2009 after it was approved to bring forward the date of abolition.

List of stations

(Freight) means stations exclusive for freight service, and other stations with ◆・◇ mark mean stations which handle freight (regular freight trains don't stop at stations with ◇ mark).

Central Japan Railway Company

Only station names from the Nagoya Station to Kameyama Station, which are under JR Central's jurisdiction, are shown below. Concerning details like business kilometers, connection lines, and stops, refer to the operation of the lines in the JR Central Nagoya region, the Kansai Main Line (Nagoya Station-Kameyama Station).

Nagoya Station◇ - (Sasajima Signal Station) - Hatta Station - Haruta Station - Kanie Station - Eiwa Station - (Shiratori Signal Station) - Yatomi Station - Nagashima Station - Kuwana Station - (Asake Signal Station) - Asahi station - Tomida Station (Mie Prefecture) - Tomidahama Station - Yokkaichi Station◆ -Minami-Yokkaichi Station◆ - Kawarada Station - Kawano Station - Kasado Station - Idagawa Station - Kameyama Station (Mie Prefecture)

Kameyama Station - Kamo Station

Only Local trains run on this section.

Cars can be changed at all stations except at the Nakazaike Signal Station.

Kamo Station - JR Namba Station

Only station names are shown below. Concerning the details like business kilometers, stops, and connection lines, refer to the list of stations of the Yamatoji Line.

Kamo Station (Kyoto Prefecture) -Kizu Station (Kyoto Prefecture) - Narayama Station - (Saho Signal Station) - Nara Station - Koriyama Station (Nara Prefecture) - Yamatokoizumi Station - Horyuji Station - Oji Station - Sango Station (Nara Prefecture) - Kawachi-Katakami Station - Takaida Station (Kashiwara City, Osaka Prefecture) - Kashiwara Station (Osaka Prefecture) - Shiki Station - Yao Station - Kyuhoji Station - Kami Station - Hirano Station (JR West) - Tobushijomae Station - Tennoji Statio - Shinimamiya Station - Imamiya Station - JR Namba Station

Association for promoting the electrification of the Kameyama-Kamo section

In response to voices requesting to the electrification of Kameyama Station (Mie Prefecture)-Kamo Station (Kyoto Prefecture) section and operate direct trains to Osaka/Nagoya, municipal governments along the line are requesting the electrification of this section by organizing "Association for promoting double-track and electrification of the Kansai Main Line's Nara-Kameyama section" etc..

Website of "Association for promoting double-track and electrification of the Kansai Main Line"

By electrifying the line, residents' commuting and travelling can enjoy more convenience and the increase of tourists can be expected for Kasagi Station, Iga-Ueno Station and Seki Station (Mie Prefecture). Donation boxes are set at municipal offices along the line in order to collect funds for electrification.

On the other hand, not a few people argue that there is no reason to promote electrification while sharing the construction cost on the grounds that the Meihan National Route, which is free of fare, runs side by side with the line and the Iga Line of Iga Railway Company as well as highway buses are being operated from Iga City, which is located in this section, to Osaka/Nagoya. In addition, residents have little interest in the electrification of this section.

Further, it is said that although historical spots or old streets are located in the surrounding area of stations that are expected to attract tourists, these areas are not well-prepared as tourist spots, unlike Kurokabe Square in Nagahama City, and new tourism demands may not be created by electrifying the line under the current situation (the main reason for Nagahama's success was its efforts as a tourist spot and direct running of Special Rapid from Keihanshin (Kyoto, Osaka and Kobe) contributed only indirectly).