Sanin Main Line (山陰本線)

The Sanin Main Line is a railway line (trunk line) operated by the West Japan Railway Company (JR West) that connects Kyoto Station, located in Shimogyo Ward of Kyoto City, Kyoto Prefecture, and Hatabu Station, located in Shimonoseki City, Yamaguchi Prefecture, via Fukuchiyama Station, Tottori Station, Yonago Station, Izumoshi Station and Nagatoshi Station (trains bound for Hatabu Station, however, run farther to Shimonoseki Station). Additionally, it has a branch line, called the Senzaki Branch Line or the Senzaki Line, that connects Nagatoshi Station and Senzaki Station. The line between Kyoto and Sonobe runs through the urban neighborhood. The above section is nicknamed the Sagano Line, and the staff of Kyoto Station sometimes guide passengers by using the combined name of "Sagano-Sanin Line." At each station of the Sagano Line, J-Through/ICOCA, Suica of East Japan Railway Company (JR East), TOICA of Central Japan Railway Company (JR Central) and PiTaPa of KANSAI THRU PASS can be used.

This line links Kyoto with Tanba Province, Tajima Province and cities of the Sanin region. In 2002, when the Tohoku Shinkansen was extended to Hachinohe Station, the section between Morioka and Hachinohe of the Tohoku Main Line, then the longest line, was separated from the line and converted to the lines of Iwate Galaxy Railway Co., Ltd., and Aomori Railway Company Co., Ltd.; as a result, the Sanin Main Line became the longest railway line in Japan in terms of operation kilometers. However, the Tokaido Main Line is longer if the portion of branch lines is combined.

Track data

Jurisdiction, length of the line (operation kilometers): Total length 676.0 km (including branch lines)
West Japan Railway Company (railway business operator)
Kyoto - Hatabu 673.8 km
Nagatoshi - Senzaki 2.2 km
Japan Freight Railway Company (railway business operator)
Hoki-Daisen - Higashi-Matsue (27.1 km) (operations between Yonago and Higashi-Matsue are currently suspended)
Okami - Masuda (16.9 km)
Sagano Scenic Railway (type Ⅱ railway business operator):
Saga Torokko Station - Kameoka Torokko Station (7.3 km)
Track gauge: 1067 mm
Number of stations: A hundred and sixty (inclusive of starting/terminal stations but excluding the stations of the Sagano Scenic Railway)

Double-track section:
Nijo - Hanazono section
The Saga-Arashiyama - Umahori section (except for a specific portion, this section has three tracks including an old line's track, and the Sagano Scenic Railway operates a sightseeing tram using this old track as a type Ⅱ railway business operator).
Ayabe - Fukuchiyama section
Hoki-Daisen -Yasugi section
Higashi-Matsue - Matsue section
Tamatsukurionsen - Kimachi section
Electrified section:
Kyoto - Kinosakionsen section, Hoki-Daisen - Nishi-Izumo section (DC 1500V)

Block (railway):
Double-track section from Nishi-Izumo Station eastward: Double-track automatic block system
Single-track section from Nishi-Izumo Station eastward: Single-track automatic block system
Nishi-Izumo Station westward and Senzaki Branch Line: Automatic block system (special)
Maximum speed
Kyoto - Saga-Arashiyama section: 120km/h
Saga-Arashiyama - Umahori section: 130km/h
Umahori - Ayabe section: 120k/h
Ayabe - Fukuchiyama section: 130km/h
Fukuchiyama - Tottori section: 95km/h
Tottori - Izumoshi section: 120km/h
Izumoshi - Masuda section: 110km/h
Masuda - Hatabu section: 95km/h
Nagatoshi - Senzaki section: 85km/h
Direction Center for operation
Kyoto - Sonobe section: Shin-Osaka Comprehensive Direction Center
Sonobe - Igumi section: Fukuchiyama Direction Office
Igumi - Nagatoshi section: Yonago Direction Office
Nagatoshi - Hatabu section: Hiroshima Comprehensive Direction Center

The respective jurisdictions of branch offices and railway departments are as follows:

Kyoto - Sonobe section: Kyoto Branch Office, West Japan Railway Company
Sonobe - Wadayama section (excluding the premise of Sonobe Station): Fukuchiyama Branch Office, West Japan Railway Company (direct control)
Wadayama - Igumi section (excluding the premise of Wadayama Station): Toyooka Railway Department, Fukuchiyama Branch Office, West Japan Railway Company
Igumi - Hoki-Daisen section (excluding the premise of stations at both ends): Tottori Railway Department, Yonago Branch Office, West Japan Railway Company
Hoki-Daisen - Yonago section: Yonago Branch Office, West Japan Railway Company (direct control)
Yonago - Nishi-Izumo section (excluding the premises of Yonago Station): Izumo Railway Department, Yonago Branch Office, West Japan Railway Company
Nishi-Izumo - Masuda section (excluding the premises of Nishi-Izumo Station): Hamada Railway Department, Yonago Branch Office, West Japan Railway Company
Masuda - Kogushi section (excluding the premises of stations at both ends) and Nagatoshi - Senzaki section: Nagato Railway Department, Hiroshima Branch Office, West Japan Railway Company
Kogushi - Hatabu section: Shimonoseki Regional Railway Department, Hiroshima Branch Office, West Japan Railway Company

While the Sagano Line adopts the line color (purple), the Hiroshima Branch Office adopts its own line color (that of powdered green tea). The Yonago Branch Office, which has virtually no established color, describes this line in blue in its route map for fare schedules as the main line under its jurisdiction (other lines are described in gray). Neither does the Okayama Branch Office have an established line color, but it describes this line in dark gray.

Characteristics of the line

Although it's the longest line in terms of operation kilometers, it's one of main lines on which a superior train that runs from the starting station through the terminal station has never been set on a schedule (other examples are the Chuo Main Line and the Chikuho Main Line). The above seems to have resulted from the uneven distribution of passengers, depending on sections as well as the policy, which has been adopted by former Japan National Railway and West Japan Railway Company since the Sanyo Shinkansen came into operation; and of strengthening the lines directly connecting cities along the Sanin Main Line and those along the Sanyo Shinkansen (In-Yo connecting line). Although electrified lines such as the Fukuchiyama Line and Hakubi Line or new, high-speed lines like the Chizu Express Chizu Line connect the Sanin region with coastal regions of the Inland Sea, the idea of connecting cities laterally within the Sanin region has rarely been considered until recently; likewise, the electrification of the line has been done in a patchy manner. The above is also applicable to construction work for speed improvement carried out in later years, and as a result high-speed and low-speed sections are intermixed. Since privatization, however, improvement has been made to a certain extent, such as the efforts to strengthen local transportation in the Tottori - Kurayoshi - Yonago - Matsue- Izumoshi section, which had been dominated by bus transportation. This line is dubbed the 'Great local Line' by railway enthusiasts because of its length, delayed modernization and the beautiful scenery one can see from the train windows.

The lure of this line for people other than local residents is 'hot springs.'
Because there are many well-known traditional hot springs along this line, people often have the impression that trains on this line run through these hot springs and along the sea coast at their own pace.

Local transportation

Although a lot of long-distance trains that run nearly the entire line were seen during the era of the Japan National Railway, currently operations are done on the basis of sections divided in pieces, as shown below.

In nearly all sections other than the Kyoto - Sonobe section, one-man-operated trains are adopted for rapid trains and those that stop at every station.

Kyoto - Sonobe section
It is nicknamed the Sagano Line. Although the number of passengers as well as trains is large since this section is within the Urban Network, almost the entire line, except for a specific portion, is single-track and the transportation capacity in morning rush-hour is approaching saturation. Some trains stop at eight consecutive stations, namely from Kameoka Station to Hiyoshi Station, in order to pass each other in single-track sections. Currently, construction work aiming to convert the Kyoto - Sonobe section into a double-track section is ongoing, and completion is expected in the spring of 2010.

Sonobe - Fukuchiyama section
Thanks to electrification and the construction work for speed-up (railroad), the limited express travel time has been reduced. The travel times of local trains, however, haven't been reduced very much, due to the stoppage time required for passing each other or waiting for the passing of other trains, as well as the speed limit necessitated by the existence of many curves in the section. In the Ayabe - Fukuchiyama section, the 'Limited Express Relay' runs for the purpose of connecting to the Maizuru Line, the Obama Line and the Fukuchiyama Line. The frequency of service is once or twice per hour. Local trains adopt one-man-operated trains, except for some exceptional cases.

Fukuchiyama - Toyooka/Kinosakionsen section
This section was electrified earlier than the Kyoto - Sonobe section, since it was deemed to be an extension of the Fukuchiyama Line and many limited express trains run from Osaka/Kyoto. However, the construction work for speed improvement has not been carried out in this section and even limited express trains run at reduced speeds in the Fukuchiyama - Kami-Yakuno section due to the consecutive sharp curves. The Shukunami signal station, which is established to await an oncoming train, is located in this section. In the past a direct long-distance local train ran from Osaka, but it no longer does. In the portion of Wadayama northward, trains are often delayed because of the Bantan Line's limited express, which runs straight into this line, and special train service in the tourism season, including the time required for tourists to get on and off. The frequency of service in this section is once or twice per hour. Local trains adopt one-man-operated trains, except for some exceptional cases. In the early morning, a train runs from Toyooka to Kinosakionsen.

Kinosakionsen (Toyooka) - Hamasaka section
The section from Kinosakionsen onward isn't electrified, and the line becomes richer in local color (the frequency of service is once every one to two hours). Takeno-gawa Bridge, one of three existing lattice bridges in Japan, is located in this section and Tagimi-gawa Bridge, near to Hamasaka Station, also has lattice bridge girders. Amarube Bridge is located along the route. The Aidani signal station, which was established for the purpose of waiting for an oncoming train, is located in this section. Local trains adopt one-man-operated trains, except for some exceptional cases.

Hamasaka - Tottori section
As the prefectural border lies in this section, only two-car local trains run other than 'Hamakaze' limited express (one round trip). The JR West diesel car Series Kiha 33, the JNR/JR diesel car Series Kiha 40 (second generation) and the JR West diesel car Series Kiha 126 run in this section. Local trains adopt one-man-operated trains, except for some exceptional cases. The Takiyama signal station, a switchback station, is located in this section but currently it isn't used for the purpose of waiting for oncoming trains.

Tottori - Yonago section
As the construction work for speed improvement has been completed in this section, the rapid service "Tottori Liner" runs for the purpose of connecting cities in Tottori Prefecture as well as complementing the transportation capacity of limited express trains. Many trains require transfer at Kurayoshi Station. The portion from Hoki-Daisen Station onward is electrified.

Yonago - Izumoshi section
Although this section is electrified, nearly half of the local trains are operated by using diesel cars, and the frequency of service is around once per hour. Some trains that use electric cars directly connect to the Hakubi Line and the 'Yakumo (train)' limited express run straight into this line. On weekdays, the "Commuter Liner (train)" runs only as an inbound train.

Izumoshi - Masuda section
As the construction work for speed improvement has recently been completed, the rapid service "Aqua Liner (train)" runs for the purpose of connecting cities in Shimane Prefecture along with the limited express trains. Local trains require transfer at Hamada Station or Gotsu Station, and the amount of local train service is extremely small from Hamada Station westward. Although a train of one round trip had suspended operation from July 18, 2006 until June 15, 2007 due to the interruption of the Sanko Line, the train in question resumed its operation in the wake of the Sanko Line's restoration. Furthermore, a local train of one round trip directly connecting to the Sanko Line commenced operation.

Masuda - Nagatoshi section
Because the line crosses the prefectural border of Shimane and Yamaguchi in this section, the number of passengers and services is quite small compared with other sections of Sanin Main Line; the frequency of service is about once every two hours, and some trains don't run on Thursdays. While most trains run between Masuda and Nagatoshi, some run between Nago/Higashi-Hagi and Nagatoshi. No superior trains run from Masuda Station westward, and most trains are a single-car trains that run without conductors on board. Trains run along the sea coast in this section, and the scenery from the windows is excellent. Sogo-gawa Bridge, located between Susa Station and Utago Station, is well-known as a great spot for picture-taking because it's located at the mouth of the Sogo-gawa River that flows into the Sea of Japan.

Nagatoshi - Shimonoseki section
Although the Sanin Main Line ends at Hatabu Station, trains run farther to Shimonoseki Station.

The capacity of transportation in this section was once considered insufficient, and in the past certain trains, such as the express service 'Isokaze (train),' were split at Nagatoshi Station and ran via the Mine Line.

Because Shimonoseki City area, especially Ogushi Station southward, is included in the Kitakyushu Metropolitan Area (Kanmon Metropolitan Area), the number of services and cars per train increases in this area and the frequency of service is about once per hour. In the past some trains ran, via Kanmon Tunnel, to Moji Station/Kokura Station (Fukuoka Prefecture) in Kitakyushu City, but local trains that directly connected the area under the jurisdiction of JR West and that of JR Kyushu were abolished through the schedule amendment of October 2005, and currently all trains stop at Shimonoseki Station and then turn back.

On July 1, 2007, the 'Misuzu Shiosai' sightseeing train was put into service (rapid train service is available on Saturdays, Sundays and national holidays).

Nagatoshi - Senzaki section (Senzaki Branch Line)
All trains, except for the 'Misuzu Shiosai' sightseeing train (running directly to Shimonoseki), run without conductors on board and basically connect to the Mine Line directly, except for some trains that shuttle within this section. This is because the Senzaki Branch Line was constructed on the premise of connecting to the Mine Line. In fact, the Senzaki Branch Line was originally a freight branch line of the Mine Line when it came into operation.

Superior trains

Trains connecting between Kyoto/Osaka or Tokyo and Tottori westward used to run on the Wadayama - Tottori section of the Sanin Main Line or on the Tsuyama Line/the Inbi Line via Okayama in the case of Tokyo, but the Chizu Express Chizu Line replaced them since the start of its operation. Currently, most limited express trains starting from Kyoto/Osaka use electric cars and run to Kinosakionsen Station.
The following trains run in the Kyoto - Tottori section:
Fukuchiyama Station is the center of the North Kinki Big X Network (only regular trains/trains running on the Sanin Main Line are listed). Only station names other than those of the Sanin Main Line are linked.
The same applies to the following:
Overnight trains are mentioned later. While limited express trains using new model cars run in the Tottori - Masuda section thanks to the completion of construction work for speed improvement in recent years, no superior trains have run in the Masuda - Hatabu section since the express service 'Isokaze (train)' was abolished.

Kyoto - Ayabe section
Limited Express 'Maizuru (train)' (Kyoto Station - Higashi-Maizuru Station)
* The limited express 'Maizuru' connects with 'Hashidate,' 'Tanba' and 'Kinosaki,' as mentioned below.

Kyoto - Fukuchiyama section
Limited Express 'Hashidate (train)' (Kyoto Station - Amanohashidate Station)
Limited Express 'Tango (train)' (Kyoto Station - Fukuchiyama Station)
Limited Express 'Tango Discovery' (Kyoto Station - Higashi-Maizuru Station/Toyooka Station) (via Kitakinki Tango Railway Corporation's Miyafuku and Miyazu lines)
Kyoto - Kinosakionsen section
Limited Express 'Kinosaki (train)' (Kyoto Station - Kinosakionsen Station)
Fukuchiyama - Kinosakionsen section
Limited Express 'Kitakinki (train)' (Shin-Osaka Station - Fukuchiyama Station/Toyooka Station/Kinosakionsen Station)
Wadayama - Tottori section
Limited Express 'Hamakaze (train)' (Osaka Station - Kasumi Station/Hamasaka Station/Tottori Station)

In the section from Tottori westward, following trains are in service as limited express trains connecting cities like Tottori, Yonago and Masuda. As the construction work for speed improvement has been completed in the Tottori -Masuda section, new-model cars are being used by these limited express trains. These limited express trains run at 120 km/h between Tottori Station and Izumoshi Station and at 110 km/h between Izumoshi Station and Masuda Station.

Tottori - Masuda section
Limited Express 'Matsukaze (train)' (Tottori Station - Yonago Station/Masuda Station)
Limited Express 'Oki (train)' (Tottori Station/Yonago Station - Shin-Yamaguchi Station)

The following trains operate as In-Yo connecting limited express service. These trains connect to Tokaido Shinkansen at Kyoto Station/Shin-Osaka Station and to Sanyo Shinkansen at Himeji Station/Okayama Station.

Tottori - Kurayoshi section
Limited express 'Hakuto (train)' (Kyoto Station - Tottori Station/Kurayoshi Station) (via the Chizu Express Line/Inbi Line)
Hoki-Daisen - Yonago - Izumoshi section
Limited express 'Yakumo (train)' (Okayama Station - Izumoshi Station) (via the Hakubi Line)

Additionally, the following trains are in service as overnight trains. Since the express 'Daisen (train)' (Osaka Station - Yonago Station) and 'Izumo (train)' overnight train service (Tokyo Station - Izumoshi Station) were abolished in the wake of the schedule revisions made on October 16, 2004 and March 18, 2006 respectively, only trains via the Hakubi Line are in service.

Hoki-Daisen - Yonago - Izumoshi section
Overnight train service 'Izumo (train)' (Tokyo Station - Izumoshi Station) (via the Hakubi Line)

Freight trains

Freight trains are in service only in the sections of Hoki-Daisen Station - Yonago Station and Okami Station - Masuda Station. All trains directly connect to the Hakubi Line or the Yamaguchi Line, but no trains complete operation within the area of the Sanin Main Line.

For details, refer to the form of operation of the Hakubi Line and the freight trains of the Yamaguchi Line.

Limited Express

JNR/JR Limited Express Series 183
Kyoto Station - Kinosakionsen Station (Maizuru (train), Tango (train), Hashidate (train) and Kitakinki (train))
JR (West) Limited Express Series 285
Hoki-Daisen Station - Izumoshi Station (Izumo (train))
JNR/JR Limited Express Series 381
Hoki-Daisen Station - Izumoshi Station (Yakumo (train))
JNR/JR Limited Express (diesel car) Series Kiha 181
Wadayama Station - Tottori Station (Hamakaze (train))
JR (West) Limited Express (diesel car) Series Kiha 187
Tottori Station - Masuda Station (Matsukaze (train)/Oki (train))
HOT Limited Express (diesel car) Series HOT 7000
Tottori Station - Kurayoshi Station (Hakuto (train))
KTR Limited Express (diesel car) Series KTR 8000
Kyoto Station - Fukuchiyama Station (Tango Discovery)

Local trains/Rapid trains

JNR/JR Suburban Train Series 113
Kyoto Station - Kinosakionsen Station, Nishi-Izumo Station - Yonago Station (Commuter Liner (train))
JNR/JR Suburban Train Series 115
Kyoto Station - Kinosakionsen Station, Hoki-Daisen Station - Nishi-Izumo Station
JNR/JR Suburban Train Series 117
Kyoto Station - Sonobe Station
JR (West) Suburban Train Series 221
Kyoto Station - Sonobe Station
JR (West) diesel car Series Kiha 33
Hamasaka Station - Tottori Station
JNR/JR diesel car Series Kiha 40 (second generation)
Toyooka Station (Hyogo Prefecture) - Hatabu Station
JR (West) diesel car Series Kiha 120
Matsue Station - Shinji Station, Izumoshi Station - Nagatoshi Station, Nagatoshi Station - Senzaki Station
JR (West) diesel car Series Kiha 126
Hamasaka Station - Masuda Station ('Tottori Liner' in the Tottori - Yonago/Izumoshi/Nishi-Izumo section and 'Aqua Liner (train)' in the Yonago - Hamada/Masuda section)
In the Hamasaka - Tottori section, local trains using JR (West) diesel car Series Kiha 121 are in service.

Freight trains

JNR/JR Diesel Locomotive Type DD51/Taki 1100
Masuda Station - Okami Station
JNR/JR Electric Locomotive Type EF 64/Container freight cars
Hoki-Daisen Station - Yonago Station

Summary

By 1899, the Kyoto Electric Railway, which had worked to construct a railway connecting Kyoto and Maizuru City, completed the Kyoto - Sonobe section. The Sonobe - Ayabe section was constructed by the government, which was in hurry to extend the line to Maizuru, the site of a naval base, in preparation for the Japanese-Russo War. The Fukuchiyama - Ayabe section came into operation in 1904 as an extension of the Hankaku Railway's Hankaku Line, which connects to Maizuru. Subsequently, the Kyoto Electric Railway and Hankaku Railway were nationalized and the Kyoto - Ayabe section came into operation as the Kyoto Line in 1910.

The Fukuchiyama - Wadayama - Kasumi section came into operation by 1911 as an extension of what is now the Bantan Line, which was constructed by the Sanyo Railway Company.

The Hamasaka - Izumoimaichi (present Izumoshi Station) section came into operation in 1911 by extending, both eastward and westward, the state-operated line that had come into operation in 1909 as the first railway in the Sanin region, and connected Mikuriya Station - Yonago Station - Sakai Station (present Sakaiminato Station).

Thanks to the completion of Amarube Bridge and Tokan Tunnel in the following year, the Kasumi - Hamasaka section came into operation; consequently, the Kyoto - Izumoimaichi section became the Sanin Main Line. The line was extended stepwise from Izumoimaichi westward and then to Susa Station in 1928.

Utago - Shomyoichi (present Nagatoshi Station) - Agawa section and Shomyoichi - Senzaki section came into operation by 1930 as the extension of the Mine Line (Mine Line). The Kogushi - Hatabu section had been owned by Sanyo Denki Kido, but it was nationalized in 1925 and renamed as the Kogushi Line. The line was extended to Agawa Station in 1928.

In 1933, the Susa - Utago section came into operation and by incorporating the Mine Line's Utago - Shomyoichi - Agawa section/Shomyoichi - Senzaki section as well as the Kogushi Line, the entire portion of the Sanin Main Line consisting of the Kyoto - Hatabu section and Shomyoichi - Senzaki section opened.

Eventually, the Hatabu - Higashi section of the Choshu Railway, being the portion that was not nationalized, became a line of Sanyo Denki Kido (a tramway company, currently the Sanden Kotsu bus company).

From Kyoto Electric Railway to the Kyoto Line

February 15, 1897: Kyoto Electric Railway's Nijo - Saga section (3 miles 65 chains (unit) ≒6.14 km) came into operation. Nijo Station and Saga Station (Saga-Arashiyama Station) commenced operations.

April 27: The Omiya - Nijo section (2M4C≒3.30 km) came into operation as an extension of the line. Omiya Station and Tanbaguchi Station commenced operations.

November 16: The Kyoto - Omiya section (38C≒0.76 km) came into operation as an extension of the line. The line was linked to Japan National Railways' Kyoto Station.

January 1, 1898: Hanazono Station commenced operation.

August 1, 1899: Omiya Station was abolished.

August 15: The Saga - Sonobe section (15M69C≒25.53 km) came into operation as an extension of the line. Kameoka Station, Yagi Station and Sonobe Station commenced operations.

November 12, 1902: The unit of operation distance was simplified from "mile-chain" to "mile" only (from 22M16C to 22.2M).

January 15, 1905: Omiya Station restarted its operations.

August 1, 1907: The Kyoto Electric Railway was nationalized.

October 12, 1909: The name of the line was established and the Kyoto - Sonobe section was named the Kyoto Line.

August 25, 1910 : The Sonobe - Ayabe section (26.1 M≒42.00 km) came into operation as an extension of the line. Hiyoshi Station, Goma Station, Wachi Station and Yamaga Station commenced operations.

September 16, 1911: Omiya Station was abolished.

Hankaku Line (Ayabe - Fukuchiyama section)

November 3, 1904: The Fukuchiyama - Ayabe - Shin-Maizuru (present Higashi-Maizuru) section came into operation (the distance of the Fukuchiyama - Ayabe section is 7.7 M≒12.39 km). The line was leased to Hankaku Railway. Ayabe Station, Isa Station and Fukuchiyama Station commenced operations in the section corresponding to the current Sanin Main Line.

August 1, 1907: Hankaku Railway was nationalized.

October 12, 1909: The name of the line was established, and the section of Kanzaki Station (present Amagasaki Station (JR West)) - Fukuchiyama - Ayabe - Shin-Maizuru was named the Hankaku Line.

Bantan Line (Fukuchiyama - Kasumi section)

July 1, 1908: The Wadayama - Yoka section (7.5 M≒12.07 km) came into operation. Yabu Station and Yoka Station commenced operations.

July 10, 1909: Yoka - Toyooka section (10.7 M≒17.22 km) came into operation as an extension of the line. Ebara Station and Toyooka Station commenced operations.

September 5: The Toyooka - Kinosaki section (6.0 M≒9.66 km) came into operation as an extension of the line. Kinosaki Station (Kinosakionsen Station) commenced operation.

October 12: The name of the line was established and the section of Shikamako Station - Himeji Station - Wadayama Station - Kinosaki Station was named the Bantan Line.

October 25, 1911: The Kinosaki - Kasumi section (13.7 M≒22.05 km) came into operation as an extension of the line. The Wadayama - Fukuchiyama section (19.0 M≒30.58 km) came into operation as a branch line. Kami-Kawaguchi Station, Shimo-Yakuno Station, Kami-Yakuno Station, Yanase Station, Takeno Station, Satsu Station and Kasumi Station commenced operations.

The Sanin Main Line (before the opening of the entire line)

November 1, 1902: The Sakai (present-day Sakaiminato Station) - Yonago - Mikuriya section came into operation (the distance of Yonago - Mikuriya is 12M5C≒19.41 km). Yonago Station, Yodoe Station and Mikuriya Station commenced operations in the section corresponding to the current Sanin Main Line.

December 1: Kumanto Station (Hoki-Daisen Station) commenced operation.

August 28, 1903: The Mikuriya - Yabase section (11.0M≒17.70 km) came into operation as an extension of the line. Shimoichi Station, Akasaki Station and Yabase Station (current Urayasu Station) commenced operations.

December 20: The Yabase - Kurayoshi section (9.7M≒15.61 km) came into operation as an extension of the line. Yura Station and Kurayoshi Station commenced operations.

March 15, 1904: The Kurayoshi - Matsuzaki section (3.4M≒5.47 km) came into operation as an extension of the line. Matsuzaki Station commenced operation.

May 15, 1905: The Matsuzaki - Aoya section (7.4M≒11.91 km) came into operation. Tomari Station and Aoya Station commenced operations.

April 28, 1907: The Aoya - Tottori temporary station section (12.9M≒20.76 km) came into operation as an extension of the line. Hamamura Station, Hogi Station, Koyama Station and the Tottori temporary station commenced operations.

April 5, 1908: The Tottori - Tottori temporary station section (1.1M≒1.77 km) and Yonago - Yasugi section (5.5M≒8.85 km) came into operation as extensions of the line. The station of origin was changed from Sakai Station to Tottori Station, while the Tottori - Yasugi section and Yonago - Sakai section became the main line and branch line, respectively. Tottori Station and Yasugi Station commenced operations. The Tottori temporary station was abolished.

November 8: The Yasugi - Matsue section (12.5M≒20.12 km) came into operation as an extension of the line. Arashima Station, Iya Station, Makata Station (Higashi-Matsue Station) and Matsue Station commenced operations.

March 11, 1909: Nawa kari-jokojo (temporary stop) commenced operation.

October 12: The name of the line was established, and the Tottori - Yonago - Matsue section was named the Sanin Main Line.

November 7: The Matsue - Shinji section (10.6M≒17.06 km) came into operation as an extension of the line. Yumachi Station (current Tamatsukurionsen Station) and Shinji Station commenced operations.

June 10, 1910: The Iwami - Tottori section (11.4M≒18.35 km) and Shinji - Shobara section (2.5M≒4.02 km) came into operation as an extension of the line. Iwami Station and Shobara Station commenced operations.

October 10: The Shobara - Izumoimaichi section (7.2M≒11.59 km) came into operation as an extension of the line. Shiomi Station (current Fukube Station), Naoe Station and Izumoimaichi Station (current Izumoshi Station) commenced operation.

October 1, 1911: Kumanto Station was renamed as Daisen Station. November 10: The Hamasaka - Iwami section (8.7M≒14.00 km) came into operation as an extension of the line. Hamasaka Station and Igumi Station commenced operations.

January 31, 1912: Nawa kari-jokojo was upgraded to a temporary station and commenced operation as the Nawa temporary station.

March 1: The Kasumi - Hamasaka section (11.1M≒17.86 km) came into operation as an extension of the line, and the entire portion of Kyoto - Izumoimaichi opened. The whole portion of the Kyoto Line, the Ayabe - Fukuchiyama section of the Hankaku Line and the Fukuchiyama - Kasumi section of the Bantan Line were incorporated into the Sanin Main Line. Yoroi Station and Kutani Station commenced operations.

March 2: The Genbudo temporary station commenced operation.

May 1: Kurayoshi Station was renamed as Agei Station.

November 21, 1913: The Izumoimaichi - Oda section (9.6M≒15.45 km) came into operation as an extension of the line. Chiimiya Station (current Nishi-Izumo Station), Konan Station and Oda Station commenced operations.

March 10, 1915: Shimo-Hojo Station commenced operation.

March 31: The Kiyomizu-dera temporary station commenced operation in the Yonago - Yasugi section.

July 11: The Oda - Iwami-Oda section (10.6M≒17.06 km)came into operation as an extension of the line. Tagi Station, Hane Station, Kute Station and Iwami-Oda Station (current Odashi Station) commenced operations.

May 1, 1917: Daisen Station was renamed Hoki-Daisen Station.

May 15: The Iwami-Oda - Nima section (7.3M≒11.75 km) came into operation as an extension of the line. Isotake Station and Nima Station commenced operations.

April 21, 1918: The Genbudo temporary station was upgraded to a station and commenced operation as Genbudo Station.

November 25: The Nima - Asari section (11.9M≒19.15 km) came into operation as an extension of the line. Maji Station, Yunotsu Station, Kuromatsu Station and Asari Station commenced operations.

December 25, 1920: The Asari - Tsunozu section (6.6M≒10.62 km) came into operation as an extension of the line. Iwami-Gotsu Station (current Gotsu Station) and Tsunozu Station commenced operations.

September 1, 1921: The Tsunozu - Hamada section (9.1M≒14.65 km) came into operation as an extension of the line. Hashi Station, Shimoko Station and Hamada Station commenced operations.

March 10, 1922: The Hamada - Sufu section (5.9M≒9.50 km) came into operation as an extension of the line. Iwami-Nagahama Station (current Nishi-Hamada Station) and Sufu Station commenced operations.

September 1: The Sufu - Mihomisumi section (6.1M≒9.82 km) came into operation as an extension of the line.
Mihomisumi Station commenced operation.

December 26, 1923: The Mihomisumi - Iwami-Masuda (current Masuda Station) section (13.6M≒21.89 km) came into operation as an extension of the line. The line was connected with the Yamaguchi Line. Kamate Station and Iwami-Tsuda Station commenced operations.

April 1, 1924: Orii Station commenced operation.

March 8, 1925: The Iwami-Masuda - Iwami-Kohama section (6.1M) came into operation as an extension of the line. Iwami-Kohama Station (current Todakohama Station) commenced operation.

July 6: The Hakuto temporary station commenced operation in the Koyama - Hogi section.

October 10: Shimoyama Station commenced operation.

November 1: Iwami-Kohama Station was renamed as Todakohama Station.

April 1, 1926: Okami Station commenced operation.

September 16: Shizuma Station commenced operation.

September 17: Daisenguchi Station commenced operation.

June 19, 1927: The Todakohama - Iinoura section (2.3M≒3.70 km) came into operation as an extension of the line. Iinoura Station commenced operation.

March 25, 1928: The Iinoura - Susa section (7.7M≒12.39 km) came into operation as an extension of the line. Esaki Station and Susa Station commenced operations.

July 4: The Yabasehama temporary station (current Yabase Station) commenced operation.

September 11: Suetsune Station commenced operation.

October 25: Iwami-Fukumitsu Station commenced operation.

August 17, 1929: The Matsuoyama signal station was established in the Saga - Umahori section.

December 25: Kimachi Station commenced operation.

April 1, 1930: The unit of operation distance was changed from miles to meters (the distance of Kyoto - Susa: from 336.8M to 542.0 km). The Makata - Makatako section of the freight branch line (1.0 km) came into operation. The Makatako freight station commenced operation. Freight service between Kyoto and Tanbaguchi was abolished.

July 18, 1931: The Moroyose temporary station commenced operation.

The Mine Line

November 3, 1924: The Mine Line's Shomyoichi - Nagato-Misumi section (3.2M≒5.15 km) came into operation as an extension of the line. Nagato-Misumi Station commenced operation.

April 3, 1925: The Nagato-Misumi - Hagi section (11.6M≒18.67 km)came into operation as an extension of the line. Sanmi Station, Tamae Station and Hagi Station commenced operations.

November 1: The Hagi - Higashi-Hagi section (2.3M≒3.70 km) came into operation as an extension of the line. Higashi-Hagi Station commenced operation.

December 9, 1928: The Shomyoichi - Kiwado section of the branch line (3.3M≒5.31 km) came into operation. Kiwado Station commenced operation.

April 24, 1929: The Higashi-Hagi - Nago section (7.4M≒11.91 km) came into operation as an extension of the line. Nagato-Oi Station and Nago Station commenced operations.

October 13: The Kiwado - Nagato-Furuichi section of the branch line (2.5M≒4.02 km) came into operation as an extension of the line. Nagato-Furuichi Station commenced operation.

April 1, 1930 - The unit of operation distance was changed from miles to meters (Shomyoichi - Nago section: from 4.5M to 39.4 km, Shomyoichi - Nagato-Furuichi section: from 5.8M to 9.4 km).

May 15: The Shomyoichi - Senzaki section of the freight branch line (2.2 km) came into operation. The Senzaki freight station commenced operation.

December 7: The Nagato-Furuichi - Agawa section (18.4 km) came into operation as an extension of the line, and the line was connected with the Kogushi Line. Hitomaru Station, Igami Station and Nagato-Awano Station commenced operations.

November 15, 1931: The Nago - Utago section (11.0 km) came into operation as an extension of the line. Kiyo Station and Utago Station commenced operations.

Choshu Railway=>The Kogushi Line

April 22, 1914: Choshu Railways' Higashi-Shimonoseki - Hatabu - Kogushi section came into operation (the distance from Hatabu to Kogushi is 14.8M≒23.82 km). Akadaguchi Stop, Ayaragi Station, Yasuoka Station, Fukue Station, Yoshimi Station, Umegatoge Station, Kuroimura Station, Kawatanaonsen Station and Kogushi Station commenced operations in the section corresponding to the current Sanin Main Line.

March 1, 1917: Akadaguchi Stop was abolished.

June 1, 1925: The Hatabu - Kogushi section was nationalized and became the Kogushi Line. The line was shortened by 0.1M(≒0.16 km) overall.

August 16: The Kogushi - Takibe section (9.4M≒15.13 km) came into operation as an extension of the line. Yutama Station, Nagato-Futami Station and Takibe Station commenced operations.

September 9, 1928: The Takibe - Agawa section (4.8M≒7.72 km) came into operation as an extension of the line. Kottoi Station and Agawa Station commenced operations.

April 1, 1930: The unit of operation distance was changed from miles to meters (from 28.9M to 46.4 km).

After the opening of the entire line

February 24, 1933: The Susa - Utago section (8.8 km) came into operation as an extension of the line, and as a result the whole line extending from Kyoto to Hatabu was opened. By incorporating the Utago - Shomyoichi - Agawa section and Shomyoichi - Senzaki section of the Mine Line as well as the whole of the Kogushi Line, the Kyoto - Hatabu section and Shomyoichi - Senzaki section became the Sanin Main Line.

July 26: The Shomyoichi - Senzaki section of the branch line commenced passenger service.

May 1, 1935: Yusato Station commenced operation.

July 20: Umahori Station, Namikawa Station, Chiyokawa Station and Yoshitomi Station commenced operations.

October 1: Kajikuri Station commenced operation in the Yasuoka - Ayaragi section.

April 15, 1936: The Matsuoyama signal station was upgraded to a station, and Hozukyo Station commenced operation.

April 10, 1937: Nogi Station commenced operation.

June 1, 1938: The Moroyose temporary station was upgraded to a station, and Moroyose Station commenced operation.

August 20: Yabase Station was renamed as Higashi-Yabase Station. The Yabasehama temporary station was upgraded to a station, and Yabase Station commenced operation.

August 10, 1941: The operations of Yoshitomi Station and Kajikuri Station were suspended.

October 1, 1943: The Takiyama signal station was established in the Shiomi - Tottori section.

May 30, 1945: The Hieda signal station was established in the Ayaragi - Hatabu section.

November 14: The Hieda signal station was abolished.

April 25, 1946: The Tachiki signal station was established in the Wachi - Yamaga section.

June 26, 1947: Shibayama Station commenced operation.

November 1: The Tachiki signal station was upgraded to a station, and Tachiki Station commenced operation.

October 13, 1948: Kokufu Station commenced operation.

March 1, 1949: Shiomi Station was renamed as Fukube Station.

May 11: Yumachi Station was renamed as Tamatsukurionsen Station.

December 15: Higashi-Yabase station and Iwami-Nagahama Station were renamed as Urayasu Station and Nishi-Hamada Station, respectively.

January 1, 1950: Higashihama Station and Oiwa Station commenced operations.

October 1, 1951: Yoshitomi Station resumed operation.

November 1: Nakayamaguchi Station commenced operation.

October 10, 1953: Funaoka Station commenced operation.

February 10, 1955: The Nawa temporary station was upgraded to a station, and Nawa Station commenced operation.

August 1: The Nishi-Hamada - Hamadako section of the freight branch line (2.3 km) came into operation. Hamadako freight station commenced operation.

February 11, 1957: Aseri Station commenced operation.

April 1: Izumoimaichi Station was renamed as Izumoshi Station.

February 12, 1958: Takatsu Station commenced operation.

July 19: Ukahongo Station commenced operation.

March 1, 1959: Kushiro Station commenced operation.

April 1: Uyagawa Station commenced operation.

April 16: Amarube Station commenced operation.

April 1, 1960: Koshigahama Station commenced operation.

November 1, 1962: Shomyoichi Station was renamed as Nagatoshi Station.

November 22: The Hinogawa signal station was established in the Hoki-Daisen - Yonago section.

December 1: The Hinogawa signal station - Yonago section was upgraded to a double-track section.

June 1, 1963: Freight service in the Nagatoshi - Senzaki section was abolished.

January 21, 1964: Ii Station commenced operation.

October 1: Kiyomizu-dera temporary station was abolished. The Kiyomizu-dera signal station was established.

October 1, 1966: Iwami-Masuda Station was renamed as Masuda Station. The Hoki-Daisen - Hinogawa signal station section was upgraded to a double-track section. The Hinogawa signal station was abolished.

September 18, 1968: The Ayabe - Ishihara section was upgraded to a double-track section.

September 23: The Shukunami signal station was established in the Yoka - Ebara section.

March 1, 1969: The Hakuto temporary station was abolished.

September 26: The Ishihara - Fukuchiyama section was upgraded to a double-track section.

February 21, 1970: The Tamatsukurionsen - Kimachi section was upgraded to a double-track section.

June 1: Iwami-Gotsu Station was renamed as Gotsu Station.

February 1, 1971: Iwami-Oda Station was renamed as Odashi Station.

February 14, 1972: Agei Station was renamed as Kurayoshi Station.

April 1, 1973: Makata Station was renamed as Higashi-Matsue Station.

April 1, 1975: The Higashi-Matsue - Makatako section of the freight branch line (1.0 km) was abolished. The Makatako freight station was abolished.

March 16, 1976: The track of the Kyoto - Nijo section was elevated. Tanbaguchi Station was relocated.

December 1: The Aidani signal station was established in the Takeno - Satsu section.

March 10, 1977: The track near to Matsue Station was elevated.

November 8, 1978: The track near to Tottori Station was elevated.

October 31, 1979: The Higashi-Matsue - Matsue section was upgraded to a double-track section.

August 31, 1980: The Nago - Nagato-Oi section was interrupted by a disaster. Although it was restored in October, it was interrupted again.

March 5, 1981: The Nago - Nagato-Oi section, which had been interrupted by two consecutive landslides, was restored.

June 18, 1982: The Kiyomizu-dera signal station - Yasugi section was upgraded to a double-track section.

June 24: The Yonago - Kiyomizu-dera signal station section was upgraded to a double-track section. The Kiyomizu-dera signal station was abolished.

July 1: The Hoki-Daisen - Chiimiya section was electrified. The Limited Express "Yakumo" began using electric cars. Jinzai Station (current Izumojinzai Station) commenced operation.

November 7: The Nishi-Hamada - Hamadako section of the freight branch line (2.3 km) was abolished. The Hamadako freight station was abolished.

July 27, 1985: Kirihama-Kaisuiyokujo Station (ad hoc) commenced operation in the Takeno - Satsu section.

August 1, 1986: Kirihama-Kaisuiyokujo Station (ad hoc) was abolished.

October 29: The Fukuchiyama - Kinosaki section was electrified (operation commenced as of November 1).

November 1: Freight service in the Nagatoshi - Hatabu section was abolished. Kirihama-Kaisuiyokujo Station (ad hoc) was abolished.

December 28: An out-of-service passenger train fell from the Amarube railway bridge, located in the Yoroi - Amarube section.

After privatization

April 1, 1987: Due to the breakup and privatization of the Japan National Railway, the West Japan Railway Company succeeded to the line. The Japan Freight Railway Company became a type Ⅱrailway business operator of the Tanbaguchi - Nijo section, Koyama - Izumoshi section and Gotsu - Masuda section. Freight service in the Nijo - Koyama section, Izumoshi - Gozu section and Masuda - Nagatoshi section was abolished.

March 13, 1988: One-man-operated trains began running in the Nagatoshi - Senzaki section.

March 5, 1989: The track of the Saga - Umahori section was replaced by a new double-track, and its distance was reduced by 1.6 km. The old track that became dormant was maintained as it was.

March 11: Uzumasa Station commenced operation.

March 10, 1990: The Kyoto - Sonobe section was electrified.

June 1: One-man-operated trains began running in the Toyooka - Tottori section and Izumoshi - Masuda section.

April 1, 1991: One-man-operated trains began running in the Sonobe - Fukuchiyama section and Masuda - Nagatoshi section.

April 27: The old track of the Saga - Umahori section came into operation as the Sagano Sightseeing Line of the Sagano Sightseeing Railway Company (West Japan Railway Company is a typeⅠrailway business operator, and the Sagano Sightseeing Railway Company is a typeⅡ railway business operator).

November 1: One-man-operated trains began running in the Nagatoshi - Shimonoseki section.

December 1: One-man-operated trains began running in the Tottori - Yonago section.

March 18, 1993: Higashiyamakoen Station commenced operation. Chiimiya Station and Jinzai Station were renamed as Nisi-Izumo Station and Izumotaishaguchi Station, respectively.

July 23, 1994: Kirihama-Beach Station (ad hoc) commenced operation.

September 4: Saga Station was renamed as Saga-Arashiyama Station.

September 23: Umekoji Urban Green Fair Umekoji Station (ad hoc) commenced operation in the Kyoto - Tanbaguchi section. This station continued to operate until November 20, 1994. It was an ad-hoc station established as the nearest station of Umekoji-koen Park, the venue of Japan Urban Green Fair.

April 20, 1995: The Ayabe - Fukuchiyama section was electrified.

July 27: Tottoridaigakumae Station commenced operation.

March 16, 1996: The Sonobe - Ayabe section was electrified. The track of the Nijo - Hanazono section was elevated. Tonoda Station was renamed as Hiyoshi Station. Shinkyudaigakumae Station commenced operation. Freight service in the Tanbaguchi - Nijo section and the Yonago - Higashi-Matsue section was abolished.

August 21: Kirihama-Beach Station (ad hoc) was abolished.

March 22, 1997: Freight service in the Gozu - Okami section was abolished.

October 1: Freight service in the Koyama - Hoki-Daisen section was abolished.

March 14, 1998: The track near to Izumoshi Station was elevated.

March 13, 1999: Izumotaishaguchi Station was renamed as Izumojinzai Station.

September 23, 2000: The Nijo - Hanazono section was upgraded to a double-track section. Enmachi Station commenced operation.

March 3, 2001: One-man-operated trains began running in the Fukuchiyama - Toyooka section.

July 7: Construction work for speed improvement in the Yonago - Masuda section concluded.

October 1, 2003: Construction work for speed improvement in the Tottori - Yonago section concluded.

April 1, 2004: The typeⅡrailway business of Japan the Freight Railway Company (Koyama - Hoki-Daisen section) was abolished.

March 1, 2005: Kinosaki Station was renamed as Kinosakionsen Station.

November 26: The track near to Fukuchiyama Station was elevated.

March 18, 2006: The times of first and last trains of the day were advanced or put off throughout the line.

April 1: The type Ⅱrailway business of the Japan Freight Railway Company (the Tanbaguchi - Nijo section, Higashi-Matsue - Izumoshi section and Gozu - Okami section) was abolished.

March 15, 2008: Kajikuri-Godaichi Station commenced operation.

The "824 Train" daytime local train from Moji to Fukuchiyama

In the past, a local train whose running distance was the longest in Japan ran between Moji Station of the Sanyo Main Line and Fukuchiyama Station of the Sanin Main Line. Railway enthusiasts called this the 824 Train.

Prior to the mid-1960s, the Japan National Railway operated long-distance local trains while the number of limited express and express trains was small. As of November 19, 1956, when the Japan National Railway's revised schedule was implemented, 111 and 112 trains ran between Tokyo and Moji via the Tokaido Main Line and the Sanyo Main Line (ran as a night train in the section of the Tokaido Main Line, whose running distance was 1102.8 km); also, refer to the section of 'Moonlight Nagara'). As for the line running across the coast of the Sea of Japan, the 511 and 512 trains, which ran as a night train in the section of the Uetsu Line, and the 513 and 514 trains (which then had a running distance of 1055.6 km), which ran as a night train twice in the section of the Hokuriku Line and the Ou Line, ran between Osaka and Aomori.

After the revised schedule called "Sanrokuto" was put into place in October 1961, the Japan National Railway reduced the number of such long-distance local trains in an effort to draw local trains' passengers to the limited express and express trains that JNR had newly introduced, or it increased the frequency of operation. From the mid-1970s to the mid-1980's, when the number of local trains had already been considerably reduced, this 824 train attracted the attention of railway enthusiasts as the local train (slow train) that ran the longest distance in Japan.

Although some night trains had run through whole line, only this train survived after trains used in the night train section was upgraded (to Express 'Shimane' and eventually to night train 'Sanbe') or trains used in the night train section and the day train section were split (trains used in the night train section was named 'Sanin' later on). Although the time schedule of this train dates back to the period when the entire portion of the Sanin Main Line opened (it was split during wartime), it became the longest-distance train in Japan when the local train running from Osaka Station to Niigata Station, then the train running the longest distance, was abolished through the Japan National Railway's schedule revision of 1972, which was implemented as part of a series of revisions made during the period of 1961 to 1975.

This train departs from Moji Station at around 5:30 in the morning and arrives at Fukuchiyama Station at around the end of the day; it takes approximately 18.5 hours at a running speed of slightly over 30 km/h, because of the waiting time for the passing of limited express/express trains and the prolonged stopping required for freight transportation. Until it ceased to run, this train used outmoded passenger cars with hand-operated doors, such as the JNR/JR Passenger Car Series Oha 35, JNR/JR Passenger Car Series Suha 43 and JNR/JR Passenger Car Series 60.

Because of the mood while traveling in such outmoded passenger cars along with its long running distance, this line attracted the attention of railway enthusiasts, or so-called 'Noritetsu,' and books describing the memories of boarding were written by travel writers such as Shunzo MIYAWAKI and Naoki TANEMURA. As of October 1982, the time immediately before Japan National Railway's schedule revision associated with the opening of the Joetsu Shinkansen on November 15, 1982, the following were the five longest-running local trains.

824 train Moji Station - Fukuchiyama Station; running distance (operation kilometers): 595.1 km
831 train Toyooka Station (Hyogo Prefecture) - Moji Station; running distance (operation kilometers): 535.2 km
726 train Hamada Station - Osaka Station; running distance (operation kilometers): 500.8 km
530 train Kagoshimachuo Station - Mojiko Station (via Nippo Main Line); running distance (operation kilometers): 476.9 km
921 and 924 trains 'Kisei Main Line overnight train 'Nanki,' 'Hayatama' and 'Taikobo train''; Kameyama Station (Mie Prefecture) - Tennoji Station (via the Kisei Main Line); running distance (operation kilometers): 442.2 km

Because of the aging of passenger cars as well as the policy, which had been adopted as part of the rationalization of the Japan National Railway, in order to shorten the running distance when using diesel cars and/or electric cars, the 824 train was split into two, namely the 824 train that runs between Shimonoseki Station and Izumoshi Station and the 548 train that runs between Izumoshi Station and Fukuchiyama Station, by JNR's schedule revision implemented on February 1, 1984. The running section of this train has been further subdivided since then, and as of 2006, in some sections, no trains run during the time period when the 824 train used to run.

As of May 2008, the regular local train that runs the longest distance (inclusive of rapid trains) is the Rapid Service 'Moonlight Nagara' running the Tokyo Station - Ogaki Station section of the Tokaido Main Line (running distance: 410.0 km). Among the trains having no reserved seats, those running between Okayama Station and Shimonoseki Station run the longest distance (two outbound trains and three inbound trains; they become the Rapid Service 'City Liner' in the Hiroshima City Network section, and a train number changes at Tokuyama Station; moreover, an inbound train in the evening becomes 'Commuter Liner (train)' from Okayama Station (running distance: 384.7 km). As for traveling hours, the local train running the Takikawa Station - Kushiro Station section of the Nemuro Main Line (outbound trains only) takes exactly eight hours, making it the longest (the running distance is 308.4 km and it's the longest, excluding rapid trains). Rapid Service 'Moonlight Kyushu,' despite being a non-regular train, runs 644.0 km between Shin-Osaka Station and Hakata Station.

Kyoto - Sonobe section

For the station names of the Kyoto - Sonobe section, refer to the Sagano Line.

Sonobe - Tottori section

Rapid Service trains departing from stations of the Sagano Line stop at every station in this section (as for train numbers, they're treated as local trains).

Tottori - Masuda section

The trains in question don't necessarily stop at stations listed here in all time zones, since some trains run only in specified sections or become rapid trains at the halfway point.

Sections that were abolished

The figures in brackets show the operation distance from the station of origin.

Freight branch line

Higashi-Matsue Station (0.0 km) - Makatako Station (1.0 km)

Freight branch line (Hamadako Line)

Nishi-Hamada Station (0.0 km) - Hamadako Station (2.3 km)

Stations that were abolished

The figures in brackets show the operation distance from Kyoto Station.

Omiya Station: Kyoto - Tanbaguchi section (approximately 0.8 km)

Umekoji Station Urban Green Fair Umekoji Station (ad hoc): Kyoto - Tanbaguchi section (1.1 km)

Kirihama-Kaisuiyokujo Station (ad hoc): Takeno - Satsu section

Kirihama-Beach Station (ad hoc): Takeno - Satsu section (167.6 km)

Tottori temporary station: Tottori - Koyama section (232.0 km)

Hakuto temporary station: Suetsune - Hogi section (241.6 km)

Kiyomizu-dera temporary station: Yonago - Yasugi section (326.9 km)

Kajikuri Station: Yasuoka - Ayaragi section (669.4 km)

Akadaguchi stop: Ayaragi - Hatabu section (673.2 km)

Signal stations that were abolished

The figures in brackets show the operation distance from Kyoto Station.

Hinogawa signal station: Hoki-Daisen - Higashiyamakoen section (320.2 km)

Kiyomizu-dera signal station: Yonago - Yasugi section (328.0 km)

Hieda signal station: Ayaragi - Hatabu section (671.5 km)

Lines that were connected in the past

Fukuchiyama Station: Hokutan Railway ceased operation on March 2, 1971 and was abolished on February 28, 1974.

Ebara Station: Izushi Railway ceased operation on May 1, 1944 and was abolished on July 20, 1970.

Iwami Station: Iwai Municipal Railway (when it was in operation) ceased operation on January 11, 1944 and was abolished on March 27, 1964.

Kurayoshi Station: The Kurayoshi Line was abolished on April 1, 1985.

Yonago Station: Hinomaru Bus Limited Hosho-ji Dentetsu Line (Yonagoshi Station) was abolished on May 15, 1967.

Arashima Station: Ichibata Electric Railway Co., Ltd.; The Hirose Line was abolished on June 19, 1960.

Izumoshi Station:

The Tachikue Line of Ichibata Electric Railway Co., Ltd. ceased operation on July 19, 1964 and was abolished on February 18, 1965.

The Taisha Line was abolished on April 1, 1990.

Hatabu Station: Sanyo Electric Railway was abolished on February 6, 1971.