Myoren-ji Temple (妙蓮寺 (京都市))

Myoren-ji Temple is the Daihonzan (head temple) of the Honmon Hokke Sect located in Kamigyo Ward, Kyoto City, Kyoto Prefecture. Its sango (literally, "mountain name"), which is the title prefixed to the name of a Buddhist temple, is Ubokusan. It has eight sub-temples (Keiko-in, Gyokuryu-in, Honko-in, Enjo-in, Kenju-in, Jisen-in, Honmyo-in and Joju-in).

History
1295: Nichizo established Myoho Renge-ji Temple on the estate owned by brewer Nakaoki YANAGIYA between Gojo-dori Street and Nishinotoin-dori Street but this was later destroyed.

1394: Nikkei rebuilt Myoho Renge-ji Temple on Shijo-dori Street and Omiya-dori Street and renamed it Myoren-ji Temple.

1536: The temple was destroyed in the Tenbun Hokke Disturbance and followers fled to Sakai City.

1544: Followers were allowed to return to Kyoto and rebuilt the temple on Omiya-dori Street and Moto Seiganji-dori Street.

1587: The temple was relocated to its current site by the order of Hideyoshi TOYOTOMI.

1788: Destroyed in the Great Fire of the Tenmei era.

Cultural properties
Important Cultural Properties (nationally designated)
Matsuosha Issaikyo sutras 3545 scrolls (and 38 sutra boxes)
These sutras were found to date from the Heian period in an examination of archives conducted by Rissho University in 1993. There are approximately 3,500 scrolls of hand-transcribed sutras contained within 38 sutra boxes. The Matsuo Taisha Shrine Issaikyo sutras were commissioned by the Hata clan of head priests who served the shrine, were transcribed on the Buddhist temple that stood within the shrine's grounds, and were completed in 1138.
The sutras were considered to be phantom scriptures as it is estimated that there were originally over 5,000 scrolls but, until this collection was discovered at Myoren-ji Temple, there were only 40 known to exist
The transcriptions were made in the 12th century but some sutras dating back to the 11th century and containing end-paper illustrations are included, and these are believed to have been added to make up for those scrolls that were lost while the collection was being transported. It was in 1857 that the collection was donated to Myoren-ji Temple by a devout worshipper.

Screen and wall paintings in the Oku Shoin (inner drawing room) and entrance hall: 38 paintings by artists of the Hasegawa School
Color on gold-leafed paper paintings of pine trees and cherry trees: 8 paintings pasted on sliding doors and 4 paintings pasted on cupboards in the first room
Color on gold-leafed paper paintings of pine trees and cherry trees: 8 paintings pasted on sliding doors in the second room
Color on gold-leafed paper paintings of pine trees, cedar trees and cherry trees: 6 paintings pasted on sliding doors in the wing of the first room
Color on gold-leafed paper paintings of pine trees and cherry trees: 12 paintings pasted on sliding doors in the entrance hall
The designation also includes color on paper paintings of willow trees: 4 paintings pasted on sliding doors in the wing of the second room
8 scrolls of Lotus sutras written by Emperor Fushimi (within a chingin box)
"Rissho Ankoku Ron" (On Securing the Peace of the Land by Establishing True Teachings of Buddhism) written by Honami Kosetsu
"Shimon Butsujo Gi" (Listening to the One Buddha Vehicle Teaching for the First Time) written by Honami Kosetsu

Location
875 Myorenji mae-cho, Teranouchi-dori Omiya-dori Higashi-iru, Kamigyo Ward, Kyoto City, Kyoto Prefecture

Access
10 minutes walk from Kuramaguchi Station on the Karasuma Line of the Kyoto City Subway.