Rozan-ji Temple (廬山寺)

Rozan-ji Temple is a Tendai Buddhist temple located in Kamigyo Ward, Kyoto City. It is a head temple of the Enjo Sect. The principal image is Amida Nyorai. It is formally named Rozantendaiko-ji Temple. The temple is known as the site of the residence of Shikibu MURASAKI.

History
Rozan-ji Temple was founded in Kitayama of Kyoto in the year 938 by Ryogen (also known Gensan Daishi, Jikei Daishi), the Buddhist monk responsible for the restoration of Enryaku-ji Temple on Mt. Hiei. It was revived by Honen's disciple Kakuyu on the southern base of Mt. Funaoka in 1243 and named Rozantendaiko-ji Temple after Mt. Lu in China. A nyobo hosho (an official document recording of the orders and words of the Emperor written by female court members) from the Emperor Ogimachi saved the temple from being burnt to the ground in Nobunaga ODA's 1571 attack but it was later relocated to its current site as part of Hideyoshi TOYOTOMI's construction of Teramachi Street between 1573 and 1592. The temple had been repeatedly devastated by fire and the current buildings were reconstructed in 1794. In 1965, the site was determined by archaeologist and historian Bunei TSUNODA to have formerly been the residence of Shikibu MURASAKI. Of the four okurodo (private Buddhist chapels of the imperial family located within the grounds of the Imperial Palace) it is the only one still to be served by a monzeki priest from a regent family.

Precinct
Main hall: Said to have been relocated from Sento Gosho-palace by the order of the Emperor Kokaku. The principal image is an Amida triad (Amida Nyorai, right flanking attendant Seiji Bosatsu, left flanking attendant Kannon Bosatsu).

Gansan Daishi-do hall: Stands at the front of the path leading to the temple. The principal image is Gensan Daishi (Ryogen). It also houses statues including those of Bishamonten, Yakushi Nyorai and Fudo Myoo. Bishamonten is one of the seven Kyoto gods of good fortune.

Sonpai-den: As with the main hall, is said to have been relocated from Sento Gosho-palace by the order of the Emperor Kokaku.

Main hall garden: Named Genji Garden and features white sand, moss and Chinese bellflowers.

Graveyard: Contains the tombs of many members of the Imperial Family including that of the Emperor Keiko. The remains of a rampart constructed by Hideyoshi TOYOTOMI still stand on the eastern edge of the temple precinct.

Cultural properties
National Treasure
Jie Daishi hitsu yuigo (the last will and testament of Jiei Daishi): Deposited at Tokyo National Museum.

Important Cultural Properties
Color painting on silk of image of Fugen and the ten demonesses
Wooden sculpture of Nyoirin Kannon in the half-lotus position: Deposited at Tokyo National Museum
Prayer written by the Emperor Gofushimi
Emperor Ogimachi shinkan nyobo hosho (an official document recording of the orders and words of the Emperor written by female court members)
Sentakushu
Jikei Daishi nijurokkajo kisho

Festival
The 'Tsuinashiki Onihoraku,' commonly known as 'Oniodori' (demon dance) held on Setsubun in which red and white mochi and beans are thrown at red, black and blue demons to pray for the casting out of evil spirits.

Location/access
Teramachi-dori Hirokoji-dori agaru, Kamigyo Ward, Kyoto City
Take the Kyoto City Bus or Kyoto Bus to 'Furitsu-Idai Byoin mae' bus stop and walk for 3 minutes. Take the Keihan Koto Line to Demachiyanagi Station or Marutamachi Station (Keihan) and walk for 10 minutes. An entrance fee is required in order to visit the main hall and garden.

Nearby attractions
Kyoto Gyoen National Garden (Kyoto Imperial Palace Park) and Seiwa-in Gomon Gate are located to the south of Nashiki-jinja Shrine which is facing west front of Rozan-ji temple across Teramachi Street. The Library of the Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine neighbors the temple to the south, Shojoke-in Temple stands to the its north and to north of this is Honzen-ji Temple.

Visitor information

Open from 9 am to 4 pm; entrance fee of ¥400